Galaxy S should be more like the iPhone, 132-page 2010 Samsung report tells jurors

August 8, 2012
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We saw yesterday a Samsung internal memo in which it was detailed a February 2010 executive meeting. During the meeting, Samsung’s chief of mobile JK Shin made it clear to everyone that the iPhone is the new enemy, not Nokia, and that Samsung should adapt to the new requirements and create flagship devices that are more like the iPhone, a product very popular with carriers and customers.

At the time, the Galaxy S was not even announced yet – Samsung unveiled it weeks later, at CTIA 2010 – and Apple’s flagship device was the iPhone 3GS, with the iPhone 4 launching in June of that year.

While that piece of evidence, which Samsung fought hard to keep out of court but was ultimately admitted into evidence, did not say specifically that the iPhone has to be copied, it clearly doesn’t help Samsung’s defense case against Apple’s copyright infringement claims.

If that was not enough, we now have another piece of evidence that Samsung wanted to keep out of court but that was also admitted into evidence. We’re looking at a 2010 132-page document that compares in great detail iPhone features with Galaxy S similar functionalities – at the time the Galaxy S was in testing, codenamed the S1.

In her testimony yesterday, Dr. Sara Kare was not able to read to the jury certain slides taken from the document, but she was able to describe them, as Apple’s counsel tried to show that Samsung was clearly inspired by the iPhone when designing the Galaxy S, and various other devices from the Galaxy S family.

The full report proves that Samsung has looked at various iPhone features, compared them to its prototype, and found the Galaxy S still wanting – there are a lot of slides like the one above containing observations and recommandations. The report, embedded in full at the end of the post, shows that Samsung asked its designers and engineers to polish the look and feel of the device that was to become the Galaxy S – to make it more like the iPhone, Apple would argue.

The report is quite interesting and deserves a good read, and, although you won’t find a clear “copy the iPhone” instruction, it’s clear that it hurts Samsung more than it helps it. Now that it has been admitted into evidence, it will provide more hours of fun from the U.S. Apple vs Samsung trial, which we’re covering thoroughly here at Android Authority.

Here’s the full document:

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