Dual-Core Heaven: Atrix, Optimus 2X, Droid Bionic Compared & Benchmarked

January 16, 2011
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    While we haven’t had the opportunity to play with a fully optimized build of the LG Optimus 2X yet, we do know that it is rocking some very impressive hardware. LG was eager to show us at CES its latest and greatest flagship, the LG Optimus 2X. Featuring the now legendary Nvidia Tegra 2 SoC, (System on a Chip) these three phones are set to blow the lid off every single smartphone benchmark ever before seen.

    We decided it would be a good idea to take the latest and greatest dual-core handsets announced at CES 2011, in the form of the LG Optimus 2X, Motorola Droid Bionic and Atrix 4G, and let them go at it.

    While Quadrant software isn’t still up-to-date with the dual-core craze and recognized the processor only as single-core. The LG Optimus 2X still smashed the available single-core competition, scoring the mind-blowing 2391 points.

    The Motorola Atrix, with its 1GB of ram pulled ahead of LG’s best offering, and achieved a groundbreaking 2501 in Quadrant!

    Lastly, the Motorola Droid Bionic pulled in a healthy score of 2284, which is still time nearly three times as fast as the Galaxy S, which scored 800.

    As you can see from the above, the Motorola Atrix basically destroys the competition.

    The Motorola Atrix is powered by a 1GHz Nvidia Tegra 2 processor and runs on Android 2.2. Gingerbread is most likely to come pre-installed with Gingerbread once it hits stores sometime in March.

    With Barcelona’s Mobile World Congress just a few weeks away, several manufacturers got in early and unveiled some exciting handsets at this year’s CES tech show in Las Vegas. The big news was the introduction of the world’s first handsets to be powered by dual-core processors – in the form of the LG Optimus 2X and the Motorola Atrix. We engaged the two heavyweights in a spec-based tear-up to see which looks like the best contender.

    For most, the real competition is between the Motorola Atrix and the LG Optimus 2X.

    Check out the comparison below:

    Form Factor

    Winner: Atrix

    117.75 x 63.5 x 10.95 mm; 135g

    Loser: 2X

    123.9 x 63.2 x 10.9 mm; 139g

    No matter what’s going on under the chassis, physical size is an important consideration when it comes to looking at mobile phones. We all want big screens, but we don’t want that to mean that we have to lug a brick-sized handset around with us all day long. The Motorola has a slight advantage in this round – despite being identical in thickness to the LG and almost the same in width, it’s managed to shave valuable millimetres off the length. Not only does this mean that it’s slightly more compact than the LG, it also means that it weighs a whole 4g less. It’s debatable whether you’d actually notice that small difference, but in our tense spec-off it helps the Motorola to win this round.

    Display

    Winner: Atrix

    4-inch, 960Ă—540, QHD TFT LCD

    Loser: 2X

    4-inch, 800Ă—480, LCD

    We’ve already mentioned that size is important when looking at mobile devices, and nowhere is that more relevant than with the screen. Both the Motorola Atrix and the LG Optimus 2X have 4-inch screens so they’re pretty evenly matched in terms of size. However, while the LG can only muster a relatively standard 800 x 480-pixel resolution, the Motorola dives right in with an impressive 960 x 540 and also boasts Corning Gorilla Glass for extra durability. The Motorola easily coasts to a win in this category.

    Processing Power

    Winner: Atrix

    NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor, 1GB RAM

    Loser: 2X

    NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor, 512MB RAM

    No surprises here, with both handsets sporting Nvidia’s Tegra 2 dual-core processor they’re both speedy as hell, and then some. The only difference is that while the Motorola boasts a solid 1GB of RAM, the LG runs on an industry standard 512MB. Without taking both of the handsets for a proper spin in a detailed review, it’s unclear just how much this difference in RAM count will affect performance, but it’s safe to assume that there will be some noticeable difference when it comes to speed of operation. It may well be that this is counter-balanced by the Motorola’s power-hungry high screen resolution-count, but in terms of specs, its 1GB of RAM wins the Atrix another round.

    Storage

    Winner: Atrix

    16GB microSD expandable

    Loser: 2X

    8GB microSD expandable

    Memory size is a vital consideration when comparing smartphones.  We all know the headaches of running out of memory, as with Android space can run out surprisingly quickly. Although you can switch apps from your phone’s memory to the microSD card, not all apps will actually let you do this yet, so built-in memory capacity is of paramount importance. The Motorola chalks up another winning round thanks to its 16GB memory that can be upgraded to 48GB using a microSD card. The LG only offers 8GB of space, which is expandable to 32GB.

    Camera and Video

    Winner: 2X

    8MP, LED flash, front cam, 1080p video capture

    Loser: Atrix

    5MP, LED flash, front cam, 720p video capture

    Camera and video capability has improved by huge leaps in recent years, and even from one model to the next. The LG handset pulls ahead for the first time in this spec-off thanks to the inclusion of an 8-megapixel camera, while the Atrix has a far more standard 5-megapixel snapper. Both phones offer a flash along with a front-facing camera for video calls, but only the LG offers full HD 1080p video capture and playback. The usefulness of including such high-end video capability on a smartphone is debatable, but it still puts the LG a firm step ahead of the Motorola and its 720p recording function. Both phones offer an HDMI port for hooking up to a high-def TV. LG wins its first round.

    Software

    Tie: 2X

    Optimus UI + Android 2.2 (soon to be upgraded to 2.3)

    Tie: Atrix

    MOTOBLUR UI + Android 2.2

    Both of the dual-core handsets will run on Google’s Android 2.2 (Froyo) at launch, although it has been confirmed that the LG device will soon be upgradable to 2.3 (Gingerbread). We haven’t yet heard any such confirmation from Motorola, but we want to assume that a swift over-the-air update will be issued just as soon as it’s available. Both of the phones use their own customized versions of the Android interface with the LG operating its Optimus UI and the Motorola running its own Motoblur equivalent. As there’s very little between them, and the difference between UIs is a matter of personal taste, we have no choice but to declare this round a tie.

    Connectivity

    Tie: 2X

    Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n), Bluetooth 2.1, DLNA

    Tie: Atrix

    Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n), Bluetooth 2.1, DLNA

    Just like the last round, there’s not a great deal between the two phones in terms of connectivity. Both have Wi-Fi with the identical 802.11 b/g/n standard and both also have DLNA capability. This can be useful if you want to stream content between compatible devices such as a TV or home server, but for many people it will be a feature that they never actually use. It’s nice to have however and always good to have as many connectivity options as possible. Not exactly a deal-breaker though. Once again, the identical specs lead to a draw in this category.

    Battery

    Winner: Atrix

    1930mAh

    Loser: 2X

    1500mAh

    You can have the fanciest smartphone in the world, but if the battery conks out after a couple of hours then it’s not a lot of use. The Motorola wades straight in with a no-nonsense 1930mAh which is by no means small, but it does have a lot of features to power, of which the high screen resolution comes to mind. The LG has a slightly less powerful battery (1500mAh), but it does have slightly fewer demands on its power supply. However, we have to give the win to the Motorola as its battery is considerably more powerful and both phones do run at the same clock speed.

    Check out the Spec comparison below:

    Conclusions

    As with most things in life, final decisions will be made on cost versus value. The lowest price we have seen for the LG Optimus 2X is approximately $660 US and we have reason to believe the Motorola will have a slightly steeper price tag than the LG. Of course for most their decision will depend on which carriers offer the phones and what deals they come up with.

    When it comes to the number of winning rounds, the Motorola Atrix emerges as the clear victor.  It has a high resolution screen, a speedy processor and impressive memory capacity to boot. Additionally, the number of accessories available for the Atrix, such as Smart Docks, a custom made laptop, which comprises of a screen, keyboard and battery, and a few others really help it pull ahead of the competition. When the Atrix is inserted into the back of the laptop, the screen fires up and, suddenly, you have a fully functioning net/notebook, running off of the phone.

    Despite losing out to the Motorola, the LG Optimus 2X is by no means a poor phone – in fact, it looks quite the opposite. Although being slightly behind the Atrix in terms of specs, its own spec count is still extremely impressive and currently it remains the only handset currently capable of capturing full HD 1080p footage.

    And so the battle of the Superphones continues. Stay tuned for more great information on everything related to Android!

    Comments

    • Gerry

      My Samsung Galaxy S Vibrant I9000M running the official Samsung Froyo 2.2 runs Quadrant at 993 with all normal background app still running ( push mail, txt etc) My Nexus S (OS 2.3.1) with all stock background apps running scores 1677 (but does not show detail when running the 3d graphics test). With both phones having mostly identical hardware and the main difference being Froyo vs. Gingerbread I can image what these dual core phone run when they get Gingerbread.

      However in day to day operations the Galaxy S running Froyo seems about as fast at The Nexus S on all apps and duties.

    • Darcy Alexander

      It’s a great phone. You and I both Gerry. I don’t even know what I will do with such incredible power. I’m sure there will be lots of cool way developers will figure out to take advantage of such amazing hardware!

    • williamsck1

      What about the Evo 3D for a super phone? Is it not worth talking about? It doesnt have a Nvidia Dual but it is coming with 1.2g Dual Core Qualcomm.

    • http://www.droidbionicreviews.com Droid Bionic Reviews

      they should definitley resize the screen on the new droid bionic, or at least just widen it out a little more. that way it kind of sets itself apart from the iphone’s. also im hoping they make the new droid bionic with mobile hotspot capabilities, i see huge room for improvement in that area of mobile development. even still, 3G is difficult and makes for a choppy UX. guess we’ll have to wait and see what 4G brings. great post.

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