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Chromebooks. Any good?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Lounge' started by sycotik, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. sycotik

    sycotik Member Droid Minion

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    Looking at chromebooks for a laptop replacement. The laptop is about 5 years old and is about done. Now, I dont really game on my laptop and I am not into photo editing or anything that I can think of that would be very tasking on my laptop. So I have been reading about chromebooks and it may be what I am looking for. I was about to pull the trigger on a Samsung one but then saw that Acer is about to release one this month with 4GB ram and an Intel i3 processor.

    I guess my question is if these are really needed on a chromebook and if you have one, how do you like it? Pros and cons?

    Thanks.
     
  2. imS0ul

    imS0ul Member Protocol Droid

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    Well if you don't do very demanding stuff, a chromebook might be useful if you're not willing to spend that much money on a laptop.
    Pros:
    - You get google integration right of the bat.
    - It's (usually) cheap to afford
    - It's awesome for web browsing and light tasks like that
    - It has a rather beautiful UI
    - All functionality is synced with your android device
    Cons:
    - You can't install windows apps on a chromebook
    - No intense tasks like video editing or gaming
    - You get google integration right of the bat (IDK if that's a pro or a con to you so I just added them on both lists xD)

    And I'll leave you with this: http://blog.laptopmag.com/chromebook-buying-advice
    It's a great article about your question ;)
     
  3. Joe Hindy

    Joe Hindy AA App Guy Staff Member Battle Droid

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    Like imS0ul said, as long as you don't ever intend on gaming or doing heavy tasks (photo/video editing, modeling, programming, etc) then a Chromebook ought to do it.

    Do keep in mind that many of them don't have that much hard drive space so if you have a large music collection you'll need to upload it to Google Music before you can enjoy it on a Chromebook...or just always carry an external hard drive around. Your call :)
     
  4. sycotik

    sycotik Member Droid Minion

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    I appreciate the input. I rarely game, but when I do it is on a tablet or a console. Also, I dont edit photos or videos. This would be for me and the old lady. She is going to take some online classes with it and use it as a internet surfer type of machine. All of out music is already on the cloud or in a hard drive. Also, this will not be a travel companion really. We are going to get tablets for that. Right now, I understand the cons I have read so far, but does anyone who has one regret the purchase? I am hoping to get at least 2 years out of it. For the price, I think that would be reasonable. Is my thinking correct?
     
  5. sycotik

    sycotik Member Droid Minion

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    Alright, I have decided to get an Acer chromebook. Problem is now is that there are 2 models I am looking at and cannot tell the difference. Acer 720-3404 and Acer 720-3605. Can someone tell me the difference in these 2 or are they just for the sellers to use. Thanks.
     
  6. Jonathan Feist

    Jonathan Feist Team AA Staff Member Protocol Droid

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    Sorry sycotik, I do not know those Acer models. I just picked up the HP Chromebook 14. WiFi only, 2GB model (mistake, get 4GB!) I decided on this one because of the larger screen and the Intel processor. I understand that they can all 'dual-boot' Ubuntu Linux, but heard that the Intel processors handle it better. I fully intended to get Ubuntu up and rolling, but I am finding this thing works great as is. No regrets at all.

    I have to say, if you've owned a phone with no microSD slot, you'll be fine with the Chromebook's limited storage. Sounds like you've got cloud storage rolling, it's a beautiful thing once you're up and rolling.

    Like the guys said, these things are not powerhouses, and cannot run Windows programs, but it is handling very well things like Pixlr and Chrome Remote Desktop for all of my image editing and powerhouse needs. I've been using this thing as my main machine, even writing all of my posts on the site with it, if that tells you anything, but I do not post videos, so make sure you listen to Joe Hindy.

    Good luck with your Acer unit.
     
  7. shashank

    shashank Member Droid Minion

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    Chromebooks are really appealing. I thought of buying one and install Linux on it instead of buying a laptop. But later I dropped the idea,they don't have local storage..just some 16-32GB SSD and I did not have a very good connectivity here for cloud services.Another thing is in the long run you have to pay for cloud storage but if you want use it for years.There are lot of things a chromebook cannot do compared to a netbook. I had recommend anyone a cheap netbook instead of chromebook.
     
  8. Ryu Haneda

    Ryu Haneda Member Droid Minion

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    I almost pulled the trigger on a Chromebook purchase a few weekends ago for my wife.

    They remind me of the old netbooks from 2009 or so - really small and portable, a classic "clam-shell" form factor (i.e. the laptop shape we all know very well); basically, capable units that get work done for a specific purchase group. Sheesh - the new ones have even more RAM and might even be approaching the 64GB mark for onboard storage (which could be a tipping point for some people).

    The problem? Like netbooks, the Chromebook might have shown up a little too late to the party.

    DISCLAIMER: I understand I'm throwing "netbook" and "Chromebook" around almost interchangeably. Let the reader understand: I know there are significant differences between them. I'm merely using them in context to display a point. Read on if you're curious. (END DISCLAIMER)

    When netbooks popped on the scene, everybody payed attention. Here's the thing: everybody only paid attention for a few moments.

    * The incredibly-mobile set looked at the netbook and jumped on it (professionals and travelers probably liked the lightweight platform and long battery life).
    * The college/seriously-tight-budgeted set looked at it and nabbed it too (living in a small apartment, or dorming at school, it was small enough to take along almost EVERYWHERE)
    * The new-technology-in-small-form-factor=YUM set looked at it and started messing around with it (dumping bigger and bigger SSD drives into it, more RAM, and maybe even trying to overclock those little things)

    The rest of us held back - probably complaining about the weight of our laptops, or not really having a reason to take their desktops with them all over the place.

    (Sidebar: remember when laptops used to weigh more than small children? Not even kidding btw.)

    Just a short time later, ultrabooks showed up (and then tablets really started taking hold too). That shut the door on what could have been a very interesting enterprise. Netbooks still are sold today; a lot of the me-too units morphed into clamshell form-factor tablets. The classic ones still fetch a fairly high price on the usual online shopping sites. (Even I wanted one to play around with; but for their prices, that probably won't happen.)

    Chromebooks today have come into a race that includes incredibly thought out tablet models (and a surge of me-too, very inexpensives) on the one end (including higher-end detachable keyboard models from big brands), and even more well-refined laptops and ultrabooks from companies that are bravely continuing to fight the fight for laptop recognition (not dominance). I suspect, however, that unless Chromebooks really, REALLY position themselves as essential units for more than a few groups of people (aka they convince the world that the ultra-small form factor laptop still has relevance), they may go the way of the netbook: a novel idea, a very good use of technology, but another piece of tech that was swallowed up by incredibly portable tablet technology on one end, and by increasingly more powerful ultrabooks on the other.

    Counterpoint: Ryu, who do you think you are? Don't you KNOW that Chromebooks are the next great thing, that they are capable of the next great generation of cloud computing, that they might open people up to even more mobile productivity than even they thought possible?

    Well, I will give Chromebooks credit for a very interesting concept, but they're still not for me. While they probably boot up very, very quick, they will not replace my laptop anytime soon, and they don't present me with a large or complete-enough platform to handle my everyday tasks with authority. However, for you, Chromebooks might just fix your usage problems.

    And for you, Chromebooks might just be good.
     

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