best personal assistant apps for Android
Personal Assistant apps have been around for a while. However, it wasn’t until Siri that they became a really big deal. We now have tons of options in the space, including offerings from Google, Microsoft, and SoundHound, among others. It’s an interesting space to be in right now. You can take advantage as well with the best personal assistant apps for Android! Let’s get started. Also, if you’re into hardware, check out Google Home and Amazon Alexa as they combine the concept of a personal assistant app with a hardware device to control.


AIVC (Alice)

Price: Free
Download now on Google Play!
AIVC (Alice) is a pretty standard virtual assistant with an above average track record. It includes the ability to ask for simple things such as starting various apps, the weather, time, calendar, reminders, and even simple math problems. You can also ask it about fun facts about stats, stocks, and more. Of course, it also includes the basics like calling, sending SMS, navigation, alarms, and translation. It’s not as complex or smooth as something like Google Now but it’s not a bad option if you just need something simple.
Download now on Google Play!
AIVC (Alice)

Cortana

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
It is true that Cortana still needs some work but it has too much potential to leave off of a list like this. Microsoft’s answer to Siri has a ton of things that it can do and it’s integrated into Windows 10 for near-seamless cross-platform support. Among its many features include the ability to call people, send SMS and email, track packages, tell jokes, take notes, add stuff to your calendar, and more. Again, it is a little rough around the edges right now, but Cortana is still better than most and it’ll only get better over time.
Download on Google Play!

Cyman Mark 2

Price: Free / $4.59
Download on Google Play!
Cyman Mark 2 is one of the lesser known personal assistant apps. It does the basic stuff, such as automating tasks, sending messages, finding information, and more. The developers also boast future IoT support when that proliferates a little more. Some additional features include language translation, task list management, alarm setting, unit conversion, and scheduled commands. You can download a free version to try it out or go pro for $4.59.
Download on Google Play!

Dragon Mobile Assistant

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
Dragon Mobile Assistant was released by Nuance Communications, the same company that brought us the once iconic Swype keyboard. It comes with the basic features so you can expect pretty standard functionality. This one includes something called Attentive Mode which allows it to be activated even when the screen is off and locked. That makes Dragon Mobile one of the few that offer this functionality. You can also choose between several voices and even name your assistant what you want. It's one of the more underrated personal assistant apps.
Download on Google Play!

Google Allo

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
Google Allo is kind of a wild card in the personal assistant apps space. It's a messenger application that is still fairly new. However, it also houses Google Assistant. Google Assistant can do a variety of things like deliver information at requested times, tell jokes, answer questions, search for things, add stuff to a calendar, and a lot more. It can be invoked during any non-incognito chat and be used by everyone in the chat. It's a nifty little thing that you can actually talk to that's also combined with a messenger service. It still needs work, but this could get really good in a short period of time.
Download on Google Play!

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Google Now

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
Google Now is pretty much the undisputed champion of personal assistant apps on Android. It comes with a metric ton of features which includes the basics, more advanced stuff like anticipating your needs, activation from anywhere, Google Now on Tap, and a lot more. It’s not enough that this app is solid as a brick wall but it’s also updated on an almost constant basis by Google which seems to only add to its stability and range of features. If your device has Google Play Services, you probably already have this installed which means you just have to turn it on. You can also get Google Now Launcher which puts Google Now at the forefront of your device interactions.
Download on Google Play!

Hound

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
Hound is another one of the upcoming personal assistant apps alongside Cortana. This one is done by SoundHound and it’s actually pretty decent. The basics are all covered here and includes some advanced stuff like a mortgage calculator, integrated Expedia support for hotel booking, and the SoundHound Now which opens a sing/hum music search. You can even play interactive games like Hangman. It’s only for United States residents right now, but it is out of beta and ready for public consumption. It is still a bit buggy though, so do beware of that.
Download on Google Play!

Indigo Virtual Assistant

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
Indigo Virtual Assistant is a personal assistant app that tries to focus a little more on personality and the developers encourage you to talk to it like you would a normal person. You can do the basics including sending SMS and emails, phone calls, navigation, and the usual stuff. You can also save favorites so you can repeat them later, translate stuff very quickly and for various things, and a lot more The Indigo developers admit that their speech recognition is a beta and, thus, errors may occur but otherwise it feels like an enjoyable experience that works rather well.
Download on Google Play!

Jarvis

Price: Free / Up to $1.25
Download on Google Play!
Jarvis hit it big with the Android community thanks to its obvious reference to Iron Man. Along with the basics, Jarvis comes with widget support, the ability to set wallpapers, device controls (turn off WiFi, for instance), reminders, and it’s one of the few personal assistant apps that can be used on wearables such as Android Wear. One caveat is that it only supports English for right now so be prepared for that. At the very least, the app is free to download and use to see if you like it.
Download on Google Play!

Robin

Price: Free
Download on Google Play!
Robin was one of the original “Siri challengers” and, as such, as been around for quite some time. Despite that, the developer still proclaim Robin as a beta application which means they definitely want everything to be just right before release. It supports the basic commands such as calling and sending SMS and it can also respond to gestures, find out about parking and traffic alerts, gas prices, and more. It still needs some work but it’s a pretty decent option and should become a lot better over the long term if the developers keep working on it.
Download on Google Play!

Related best app lists:

If we missed any great personal assistant apps for Android, tell us about them in the comments! To see our complete list of best app lists, click here.

Joe Hindy
Hi everyone! I'm Joe Hindy the Android Authority app guy!
  • Paul Scott

    To be honest, Apple and Siri were like a year behind the curve: Android had an “assistant” called Andy but there was another one that predated all of them, and it was originally going to be installed on Android devices from Verizon but Apple (courtesy of Steve Jobs) dumped a pile of cash on the developer and that basically ended that from happening. The project eventually became what’s known as Siri now.

    So just to be absolutely clear: Siri didn’t come about first, what became Siri was first and it was on Android exclusively for a short period of time – even if most people never knew the history behind it.

    • Phil S

      That’s exactly my point. The article starts off by saying “Ever since Apple released Siri, the Android world has craved something similar. ” But it’s not true – the Android world already had it. I’m fed up of Apple Fanboys saying look at this brilliant feature Apple has, when if they pulled their heads out of the sand they’d find it’s all been done before. Apple should be congratulated for their ability to design and market very nice hardware, but they are not innovative. They take other peoples/companies ideas and do a very good job of selling them.

      • mark

        They’re just yet another consumer OEM basically, no different to Samsung, Lenovo, and many companies do a better job of selling more.

  • Phil S

    Another lovely piece of marketing from Apple. What’s Siri got that Google Now hasn’t got? The Android world has not been craving for a Siri look-alike – they’ve had one for ages. How much does Apple pay journalists to write this sort of crap?

    • Anantha Krishna

      ask Google Now “tell me a joke”. I know it’s just utterly childish to ask that questions but certain things like that make them interesting.

      • Yes.. Apple is all about the useless features.

      • Here’s the thing, that makes Apple’s service a little more, well,… Complete, actually thought out of, developed by an ACTUAL human who has actual thoughts, instead of an engineered and coded programme that responds to only a specific order of commands and just throws you into Google search for anything but. No, seriously. I like that Google Now is more “functional,” but that’s just it, all function and NO FORM, it’s lacking.

        • Bruno

          Siri does that same thing never reads back results. With Android we can choose from many assistants. The best one that makes both Siri and google now look like nothing, is Cyman Mark II

        • Anantha Krishna

          yeah I guess you’re right.

        • David D

          First of all, you can play games with Google Assistant and ask it to tell you jokes and crap so bad argument. The cool thing about Google Now is that it works inside of Google Search. So instead of Siri telling you that it “found some results on the web” and then you have to navigate it, Google Now is built assuming that you’re actually searching for information and integrates any useful features that it has into it. Plus Google Now sounds MUCH MORE like a human (Google Now was developed by humans in case you thought otherwise) when talking with it because it understands context. So if I were to say “How old is Lebron James” with Google I’d only have to ask “How tall is he” to know his height, while with Siri I’d have to ask “How tall is Lebron James.” TLDR; Google Now and Google Assistant beat Siri in all the categories you just stated above.

        • mark

          How is responding to “tell me a joke” anything other than responding to a specific order of commands…

          And telling a joke in response to a command isn’t anything to quality as being an “assistant” anyway, unless you have a odd idea of assistants.

      • balcobomber25

        Guess I have never been that bored/lonley that I needed my phone to tell me a joke, completely useless feature to me…

    • JosephHindy

      First of all, it’s required by the FCC to disclose when an article/video is sponsored. Not doing so is actually against the law and this isn’t the black market advertising days of 2004. Please update your expectations accordingly.

      Second, these are all Android personal assistants and Siri isn’t on this last whatsoever. The intro was something called a “narrative” that explains the story behind why these things exist and why there are so many of them. Siri had a lot to do with that whether you like it or not.

      • Linked Devices

        You definitely don’t work in mass communications. It softens my heart that innocent, trusting people like you still exist.

        • JosephHindy

          I wrote the damn article!

      • mark

        Except whether you like it or not, it didn’t. Android already had voice input. Google have done loads of things to improve I’m sure Apple introduced some things (or rather, bought out a company, and paid MS for Bing voice search), but that doesn’t make the be all and end all to mention above all others.

        Maybe they were the first to give it a “name”. Except they weren’t – you might as well credit Clippy.

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        • JosephHindy

          Nobody bought Android phones for voice input. Literally. Nobody. No one bought an HTC EVO 4G and said “Golly geez, I can’t wait to try out voice input”.

          Tons of people bought Apple products for Siri and it took competitors a long time to come up with something that was even close. I love Android as much as the next fan boy, but ignoring it when a competitor does something better is how AMD dug itself into the hole it’s been in for the last 5 years and (hopefully) the hole they’re digging themselves out of with Zen.

        • JosephHindy

          Le sigh, voice input =/= “personal assistant”. Android has voice input, SIri is a personal assistant. Like it or not, they are different things.

  • bruno

    You forgot one, and the best of them all, Cyman Mark II. Check it out!

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  • mark

    “Ever since Siri came out, the Android world has wanted one like it.”

    Actually, Android had speech input before IOS. Even the first version had voice search, something IOS didn’t get to 2016 (powered by Bing). Speaking back doesn’t make it an “assistant”.

    Google Now did a lot more things that I’d associate with an assistant, these are things that aren’t about voice input: things like showing you news items based on your interests, or automatically showing you directions when you need to leave for an appointment.

    “However, it wasn’t until Siri that they became a really big deal.”

    No, rather the media made a big deal of it. And it was Apple’s name for voice input, not an “assistant”. (They didn’t even make it, wasn’t it a 3rd party application they bought?) And voice recognition on phones still isn’t a big deal – despite all the failed predictions that it would “thanks to Apple”, it didn’t happen – most people still aren’t talking to their phones.

    There are some specific use cases (e.g., while driving). Alexa and Google Home are examples where voice recognition does make sense.

  • sony

    so which one of them is the best?