AT&T rumored to launch “All in One” prepaid plans in June, starting at $50 for smartphone users

May 3, 2013
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prepaid

A few years ago the word “prepaid” had a near-taboo connotation in the United States, especially when it came to cellular devices. Carriers like Straight Talk have helped change this image, as has the release of the LG Nexus 4 and T-Mobile’s recent push of its “uncarrier” strategy.

The big carriers are having a harder time getting us locked into contracts, which is why Verizon recently unveiled its own no-contract, device payment option. It’s also likely why AT&T is believed to be creating a new prepaid cell service under its existing “All in One” brand.

What makes the new prepaid service different from their current GoPhone offering? Much more aggressive rates, for starters.

According to a report from Fierce Wireless, AT&T’s new plans will launch on June 15th with limited testing in Florida and Texas beginning later this month. The report indicates that the terms and pricing are still subject to change.

If all goes as it is should, there will be a feature plan for $35 and a smartphone plan starting at $50.

For the feature plan, AT&T will provide unlimited talk, text and an unspecified amount of limited data. The $50 smartphone plan will also provide unlimited talk and text, with 2GB mobile data. If that’s not enough data for ya, a $70 version will bring that cap up to 5GB.

Not bad AT&T, not bad at all.

How does the new plan compare to other major carriers? Verizon, T-Mobile and AT&T’s GoPhone service all currently provide unlimited talk and text for $60. T-Mobile gives you 2.5GB of data, GoPhone provides 1GB, and Verizon has just 500MB. Of course your cheapest route is still going to be with an MNVO like Straight Talk ($45, unlimited).

Right now we can’t say for sure if AT&T plans to replace its GoPhone plan with the new “All in One” option, or if both services will co-exist. What do you think, if the new AT&T prepaid plan is as good as it seems, would you be interested?

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