Apple announces 64-bit processor/OS: Impressive, but not innovative

September 10, 2013

    iOS

    A first for Apple: a 64-bit processor in a phone. The newly announced A7 processor is a first for Apple, and a real selling point for the speed and power of the new iPhone 5S. With promises of a two-fold processing increase, the “desktop-class architecture” promises to keep the harmonious Apple hardware/software balance intact.

    Then again, this is a bit like jumping out to an early lead in a race against Usain Bolt. While you can say you were clearly ahead of the best, you’re not really doing much he hasn’t anticipated, or is ready to make up for. The same can be said for chip architecture, where ARM is making important strides in 64-bit architecture across the board.

    It all sounds so exciting -- but it’s marketing buzz, really.

    If we take what Apple showed us today as a reference point, they’re touting things like “2x general purpose registers” and “2x floating point registers”. It all sounds so exciting — but it’s marketing buzz, really. When you double the prowess of the chipset and software, the natural affectation is going to be a two-fold increase in those areas.

    The real selling point is iOS 7 being 64-bit, which is where the real power comes from. Without an OS capable of taking advantage, the chipset means nothing. The native Apple apps have all been updated to 64-bit, which is great, but they’re not going to leave the rest of the world behind. Again, this is the order of the day when moving from 32-bit to 64-bit architecture.

    In the same way you’d quickly feel Usain Bolt breeze by, ARM architecture is ready to catch up in a big way for Android. The Cortex A-50 series processors are looming large, and promise the same increase in power the iPhone is currently selling you on. The difference this time is that there is no Android iteration that currently supports 64-bit processing, though we still know nothing about KitKat, which could be Android’s answer to the iOS/iPhone combo.

    Is the 64-bit iPhone impressive? Absolutely. It’s a great move by Apple, and sets them up for future improvements in a big way. For Android fans, it shouldn’t be much of a head turner. We’re into the age of software/hardware harmony, and this is really the natural progression of this new frontier. Apple may have beat everyone to the punch, but the patina of innovation will wear quickly from this announcement.

    Comments

    • Collin dubya

      90% of the iSheep won’t even know what that 64bit architecture will do for them but they will HAVE to buy it and brag about it anyways. lol.

      • Piyush

        same as people who brag about 1080p on smartphone and cant tell difference , we all hate apple but please this is getting out of hand.

        • MasterMuffin

          You can tell the difference… if you put your face 1-3cm away from the screen :D

          • Piyush

            what octa and quadcore?

          • weed

            And who can focus on that short distance?

            Another thing is that you CAN tell the difference. Ok, not everyone can, but most can.

        • Wildfire

          there’s a far difference between an 1080p screen and 640p. It’s not only about the ppi. But 1080p will show much more content. It’s like saying 1.5″ display will compete with 5″ one when they have same ppi which is non sense

          • APai

            trust an apple fan to come up with that :)

      • Ruben

        Specially having a 64bit running on 2 gigs of ram…

        • gommer strike

          IF the 64-bit iOS works how we all think it does, it can process more information in 64-bit chunks, so just think of it as double the highway(of 32-bit) to your device’s RAM. Faster pipe. Of course Apple’s native apps were rewritten for 64-bit support, but how what would this mean for other developers?

          There’s a dirty word called fragmentation :D…lol, ok ok, I concede that the latest iPhone is fully backwards compatible with older apps.

          • Xennex1170

            So basically until other apps are recompiled (and maybe optimized) for 64 bit they will not run any faster than they have on the 4S. Maybe some difference due to processor clock speed though.

          • nishantsirohi123

            what you forgot to mention is that the iOS7 is actually not going 2 get 80% of its features to the iphone4 after the update
            so in true terms that is deception from Apple(comes free with the device)

      • seyss

        did you throw that line when Samesung released the octa-core 1900mhz ARM CPU?

        • Spruce Cycle

          I know EXACTLY what an 8 core means on an Samsung device: superior Spen functionality and zero force closes when using multiwindow.

      • Afnan Muhammad

        Just like all GS4 owner who think they really own octa core processor.

        • APai

          actually, the samsung 8 core big.LITTLE does work with all 8 cores simultaneously with HMP. it’s not a bad idea, it was rushed too soon into the market.

          • James Blunt

            This only works in the Exynos 5420 version that comes in the note 3 and not the 5410 that come in the GS4 .

            • APai

              true. GS4 doesn’t have HMP, I din’t mention that expressly.

      • gommer strike

        but to be fair, how many people even today, can tell the difference between 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows(memory support aside, of course).

      • Brian Shieh

        I bet they’ll be like “Hah…I got 64 bit in this while you only have 32!” Do you have at least enough RAM? -”What about sheeps?”

    • Piyush

      have actually seen keynote AA .please see it again , its for future proofing and making higher quality apps and best use is for gpu.

      edit : the author is Nate Swanner , never mind.

      • mrjayviper

        The author for me is a biased one. I wouldn’t read his articles even if you pay me.

        • Markus Ressel

          But comment on them…

          • mrjayviper

            you got that right. I have a feeling what he’s gonna say anyway. no need to read.

            There are unbiased authors here in AA. I read their articles!

          • mrjayviper

            I have a feeling what he will say anyway. no need to read.

            There are unbiased authors here in AA. I read their articles!

    • joser116

      If KiKat is really for everyone like Google says, then I have doubts that KitKat will be 64-bit.

      • APai

        will IOS 7 be for everyone in their camp?

        • joser116

          iOS7 will be downloaded by millions of iOS users in one day, but that’s besides the point. My point is that the article says that KitKat could be Android’s answer to the iOS/iPhone combo, but I am saying I have doubts it will because Google wants KitKat to be for everyone. Right now, there are no Android phones that support 64-bit, but Google wants KitKat to be installed on everyone’s phones, so Google will probably keep KitKat 32-bit and KitKat will not be the answer to the iOS/iPhone combo.

          • Ivan Myring

            Or (like iOS 7, Windows, Mac OSX and Linux) both.

            • joser116

              I did not think of that. Very good point.

          • APai

            since it’s a point release I think we are reasonably certain that kitkat is not going to be 64 bit. more importantly, I think android has now De-hyphenated itself from IOS. sure it likes to poke fun, but the lead is comfortable over IOS, and google is now in a different zone. it does not need to stack itself with IOS. however, IOS does need to constantly bicker about dibs to new technology that they have picked while glossing over the ones they omit.

          • Xennex1170

            It is entirely possible that KitKat will be core API compatibility available in both 32 and 64 bit versions to support as many devices as possible. Since Android unlike iOS runs all apps in the Dalvik JVM, Apps will NOT be required to be recompiled to take advantage of any processor improvements since the JVM layer will do all the work necessary.

    • billnozick

      Eli Fennel (Google+er) asks will there be a difference in performance–doesn’t one need 4 gigs of RAM to take advantage?

    • isheep

      baaaa its got an apple logo on so have to buy it baaaa

    • ibnu sina

      After 1 year since the release of their shitty map, which is still shitty , they end up releasing 2 similiar phone with different price. Apple is history.

      • Alex Zhao

        Map is not the problem, screen size is.

        • viaimages

          i like the screen size of the i5.. i wish Android Flagships had a size like that. Android has that size, but i’d have to compromise on lower hardware. and yes, Map isn’t a problem as it was back when people had so many problems, it’s just still fresh in people minds.

    • Jusephe

      Yeah.. Not inovative huh ? But when android will do that it will be innovation of the year. And as I remember there was a article here earlier today that praised how 64-bit will change everything and how much more power will it bring to the table.

      Just stop trolling with articles like this, just everyone will stop trying hide their surprise and stop trying to make “if it doesn’t have 4GB of RAM, 64 bit is unusable” statements.( By the way iPhone 5S has most propably 1GB of RAM)

      This is really a true 64 bit compute powerhouse, minimally 3-4 months sooner than everybody else in industry and Apple deserves a credit for this from even the most android-ish people, that will propably never buy an iPhone.

      • APai

        NO.

        you know why people diss apple ? because they are the ones setting up themselves for something grandiose. they are the ones saying hey *LOOK* at me I’m special WHILE you aren’t.

        * this changes everything* is a mantra on their lips for practically ANY mundane tweak.

        The ability to create something new seems to be their divine right. others are simply incapable of thinking fresh.

        what a load of tosh.

        • JosephHindy

          There are two different trains of thought here. Does everyone agree that Apple should hold themselves to be the “divine inventors” as you so eloquently put it? Heavens no. That’s arrogant and egotistical and only iSheep respond to that behavior.

          But Jusephe does have a somewhat valid point. If it were a Galaxy S device or an HTC device or, heaven forbid, a Nexus device with 64-bit architecture, everyone would be losing their minds. The first to 64-bit is an accomplishment for Apple, whether we like it or not. What Nate is saying is that by this time next year, everyone will have it and that 64-bit is the natural progression that mobile devices are taking. He is not taking away from the accomplishment of Apple, but rather putting it in a realistic view in comparison to the rest of the industry.

          Is it a big deal? Yes, yes it is because let’s face it, if it were the Nexus 5 with 64-bit architecture, we would all be salivating like wild animals while the Apple bloggers would be like “eventually this is going to happen to all smartphones anyway so let’s keep it in perspective here.”

          In your own ways, neither of you are wrong here, but you’re saying two different things ;) Did Apple do it first? Yes. Should they get recognition they deserve? Yes. Are they a bunch of egotists who should really calm down with the buzzwords and “we’re the best” nonsense? Yes. The answer to all of your points is yes :)

          • gommer strike

            And um, this also happens to be a place where Android fans tend to congregate, so no shocker that everyone’s abuzz with the latest Nexus features.

            Every marketing department wants their figureheads to say to the words “the best smartphone ever made”…I mean, who’s gonna say “well we know we’re not the best, but we’re not trying to be, either”.

          • Tcv4

            No one is really raving about how the note 3 has usb 3.0, also natural progression. As long as Samsung’s storage is fast enough, it will make a huge difference.

      • joser116

        Honestly, I am always bashing Apple, but I gotta say today’s announcements makes me want to go buy an iPhone. It seems like an experience without the headaches Android sometimes gives you.

        • APai

          depending upon your needs, there’s plenty of areas you could get a headache with IOS too.

          • joser116

            Agreed, there are things that Android does better, like multitasking, but iOS7 seems to have improved it.

            • APai

              actually, there’s nothing stopping you from using it. it squarely depends on your needs.

              apple/ IOS phones are pretty darn useful to a lot of people. they make great hardware and software plus a controlled ecosystem. I simply don’t deny any of it. If it suits you – you SHOULD go for it.

              these debates here are pointless, man, they are like religious debates – all paths lead you to the holy grail of mobile computing, but there’s no nirvana :P the only people who are in bliss right now are the phone makers laughing their ways to the banks

              you will never have anything that has it ALL! every month there’s a better phone coming out, google has 2 iterations a year, how many phones will you buy ? :)

            • joser116

              I did not know this was a debate…I honestly thought we were having a good conversation O.o (scratches head)

            • APai

              well, i dint exactly mean a debate, but you know we have our viewpoints that we tend to stick to, which is why i contend forum posts are mostly like debates :)

            • joser116

              Oh OK I get you

            • APai

              for most parts we are there to exchange notes, learn from fellow users, post advice/ experience to newbies, links, etc etc.

              then there are various camps who come to different forums to troll :) and then it gets ugly. you also cannot make out if someone is trolling, and after a while it gets boring – rinse repeat :)

            • joser116

              OK just to make it clear, I own no Apple products, nor do I ever post in Apple forums I’m just an Androidfan that so happened to be impressed by Apple’s announcements, mainly because I wasn’t expecting much.

            • APai

              actually, I wasn’t getting at you at all! the trolling bits I was referring to is my exasperation at apple fans hanging out permanently in android boards :)

            • joser116

              Yup, true. Sorry lol

        • carlisimo

          It’s like that old saying, “You can please all of the people some of the time or some of the people all of the
          time, but you can never please all of the people all of the time.”

          iOS is more likely to give you a great experience with a limited number of tasks, and Android will give you an okay experience but with pretty much any task you want. Except managing photos; that’s one aspect of iOS that does not “just work” and drove me away.

          But man, I love the idea of a fingerprint scanner instead of entering a PIN, pattern, or password. And I would call putting into the home button “innovation,” even if it isn’t major innovation. It’s a small thing that you’ll use ALL THE TIME.

          • joser116

            Yup, that home button will definitely be useful. Now if only Apple added 4GB of Ram, 5-inch 1080p bezel-less screen, 4k recording, a full version of Google Now and all of Google’s services (lol) then I am sold. Well, I might as well just get the Galaxy S5 :P

    • Peter Bognar

      The ironic thing is that Apple was the one that mocked android fans by not confusing the users with technobabble, “it just works”, “twice as amazing” etc. Now we hear them touting 64bit architectures, floating points, etc. All good things…

      • Michael

        ??

        They’ve done that at absolutely every iPhone conference. What are you talking about?

    • Sir_Brizz

      64-bit is useless. Sure, the OS and some native apps will possibly run better, but in general most things won’t run better. How many productivity apps rely on having 64 bit memory registers? Yeah, probably close to zero. So this will increase the memory overhead for very little noticeable gain for most apps.

      And that is to say nothing of running 32bit apps on your 64 bit device.

      • PopeJamal

        64 bit is far from useless. It won’t help fart apps but decoding media and HDR processing are 2 examples of things that will benefit greatly.

        Don’t be a hater, this is a nice phone.

        • Sir_Brizz

          Both of those things don’t even run on the CPU on mobile devices. So exactly zero of them will benefit from a 64-bit CPU.

      • gommer strike

        What about 64-bit versions of Windows that everyone’s running today? Is that copy of BF3 64-bit? Nope.

        Nothing wrong with bringing 64-bit to the smartphone world. You’re suggesting that it’ll tax the device drastically to support 32-bit apps? Is this the case with Windows? Nah. It’ll be fine.

        I don’t see a problem with the OS and native apps running faster. The performance hit is not going to be as big as you seem to suggest it will be. We’re not trying to emulate a SNES here.

        • Sir_Brizz

          There is nothing wrong with adding it, it’s just not that interesting or cool and may never be. And there is some potential for slower performance in some cases.

    • MikeYouKnowMe

      Nate, mate, stop trolling on Apple: they have what the Android ecosystem currently is unable to offer, and all this at the hardware/software level, an area where Android was historically on top. STOP TROLLING, AA Sheep !

    • Franc012

      I’ve had a 64 bit processor on my laptop for at least 5 years, and accept for a handful of applications, they’re all still at 32 bit. I doubt mobile software will move much faster.

      • Michael

        You don’t know how easy apple has made it to recompile an app in xcode.

        • Franc012

          True. Hopefully, devs will actually take advantage of it. Otherwise, it’s useless, except for native apps.

        • Xennex1170

          Wonder if once recompiled since it would most likely only run on the 5S Developers would have to post Apps twice resulting in 5S users having to pay attention when purchasing so that they don’t end up purchasing the 32-bit version. Knowing Apple maybe they will tweak their Appstore so that 32-bit Apps will be hidden for searches from 5S devices if a 64-bit version exists. The question is whether 64-bit recompiled versions will have to be ‘re-purchased’.. (e.g. Tablet-optimized is a separate purchase from phone version.)

          • viaimages

            but isn’t the chipset backwards compatible?

            • Xennex1170

              If I wasn’t clear, simply put 64 bit Apps (5S) will not run on 32 (other iOS devices) hence having separate versions and the associated ‘fragmentation’ of Apps in the store if you will. I’m sure there is no problem running 32-bit apps on the 5S.

              Actually I wonder if there is any problems now with Apps designed for the iPhone 5′s full screen resolution running on earlier devices with the ‘shorter’ screen. Is the image cropped or shrunk in some way?

            • Michael

              the compiler and app store handle this seamlessly. For example, there’s only appears to be one version of Infinity Blade III

              And about the screen size, that should be handled in development. So if you want to support older devices, you just test/design for the smaller screen size. If you don’t do that, then your app is only compatible with a 5/5S. iOS 7 makes all that even easier with more dynamic elements. It’s wildly different than testing for an endless sea of android devices.

            • Xennex1170

              I’m confused.. Maybe I wasn’t clear with my statements since your reply didn’t seem to answer/refute the points I was making.

              Broken into bite sized pieces 1)64-bit apps will not run on 32-bit iOS; Separate versions WILL exist (Whether you will have to pay for the ‘other’ version or even see it in the App store for your device is another story).; There is no problem running 32-bit Apps on 64-bit iOS.

              2)(rephrased) Assuming the developer DID NOT design for older devices display-wise, what will iPhone5 Full screen Apps look like on earlier devices? Cropped? Shrunk to fit with black borders on top/bottom?

            • Michael

              I understood exactly what you said, and answered it clearly. You could re-read my answer and it would still apply. Which part is unclear?

              Infinity Blade Iii runs at 64 and 32 bit. I bought the 32 bit version. When they pushed the 64 bit version, I downloaded it like any regular app update. The App Store knew I was on a 5S, so it gave me the 5S version of the app. 32-bit users will get the same app from the same page, but the App Store will feed them the appropriate version.

              #2 (again) if an app is only designed for the larger screen, it won’t appear in the App Store for smaller screen devices.

              Make sense?

            • Xennex1170

              Ok, no.1 though round about you made your point clear that you do not dispute any of the 3 parts and that re-purchase is not necessary for 32/64 bit phone apps. No.2 is still unanswered.. How would it be handled on a smaller screen device? I was already pretty sure Apple would not make it easy for you to attempt it but just was curious what would happen should you be able to load an app designed for 5S screen on a smaller screen iPhone. Hope that was more clear. Will it shrink image to fit screen? Will it crop? Will it force close? Close gracefully saying the app does not have the proper image resource? Other?

            • Michael

              I understood what you were saying, and I answered you clearly. If you re-read my answer it would still apply.

              1. Infinity Blade III has one instance on the App Store. If you have a 64-bit device, you’ll download the 64-bit version. If not, you get the 32-bit version. The user only ever sees one app though. It’s quite simple.

              I downloaded it before it had been upgraded to 64-bit. When that update was available, I downloaded it to my 5S like any normal update. The same app icon, but suddenly much better graphics.

              2. If a dev doesn’t develop for a smaller screened device, then that app won’t be available (or seen) for that device. Most developers simply design for both since it’s so easy. They design one version for smaller screens, and another version, possibly with more creative use of the real estate, for the taller screens.

              Was all of that clear? It might be so simple that it’s hard for an android user to comprehend.

            • Xennex1170

              Ok, #1 you answered albeit in a round about way. I will conclude you do not dispute any of the 3 parts. I never asked what the App store will show or allow the user access to.

              #2 You have yet to answer what would happen if an app designed for 5S’ screen was installed on a smaller screen device what would it look like. Once more, since it seems clear you keep assuming the App store preventing it from ever happening.. Rephrased yet again. “Assuming you could install an App designed for 5S’ screen, what would it look like? or what would the OS do? Would it shrink, crop, force close, close with an message saying App does not have smaller screen image resources, other?

              No need to insult if you don’t understand.. I hope you have a better attitude towards fringe possibilities. If you don’t know just say so and maybe someone else can answer it. Probably a developer since your replies seem to point away from you being one. I really don’t know how else to phrase the question so that you would understand. There is no intent to make anyone feel stupid here.

            • Michael

              That’s funny. It seems like you understood my answer but just want to keep asking nonsense questions.

              I don’t know what “3 parts” you’re talking about, but I’ll explain this a third time:

              You said: “Wonder if once recompiled since it would most likely only run on the 5S Developers would have to post Apps twice resulting in 5S users having to pay attention when purchasing so that they don’t end up purchasing the 32-bit version.”

              I say: No, users don’t have to pay attention when purchasing. When you purchase you get all versions, and the appropriate version is automatically downloaded for the user.

              You said: “Knowing Apple maybe they will tweak their Appstore so that 32-bit Apps will be hidden for searches from 5S devices if a 64-bit version exists.”

              I say: No tweaking has to happen. Versioning has always been a part of the app store. You download what’s best for your device.

              You said: “The question is whether 64-bit recompiled versions will have to be ‘re-purchased’.”

              I say: Not in the case of Infinity Blade III

              You said: “If I wasn’t clear, simply put 64 bit Apps (5S) will not run on 32 (other iOS devices) hence having separate versions and the associated ‘fragmentation’ of Apps in the store if you will.”

              I say: Correct. Nothing the end user will ever know or care about. Developers will provide both versions as long as it’s a good business idea.

              You said: “Actually I wonder if there is any problems now with Apps designed for the iPhone 5′s full screen resolution running on earlier devices with the ‘shorter’ screen. Is the image cropped or shrunk in some way?”

              I say: No, there aren’t any problems because you can’t do that. Remember what we were just talking about?

              You said: “64-bit apps will not run on 32-bit iOS; Separate versions WILL exist (Whether you will have to pay for the ‘other’ version or even see it in the App store for your device is another story).”

              I say: Yes, of course separate versions exist… behind the scenes. The end user will never see separate versions. This is not an actual issue. It’s a fever dream.

              You said: Assuming the developer DID NOT design for older devices display-wise, what will iPhone5 Full screen Apps look like on earlier devices?

              I say: The user would not be able to install the app on their device.

              You said: “Cropped?”

              I say: No.

              You said: “Shrunk to fit with black borders on top/bottom?”

              I say: No… this doesn’t even make sense, as the bars would need to be on the sides. Think for a minute.

              Basically, you’re trying to place your android headaches where they simply don’t apply. Yes, I’m an iOS developer, but I don’t have an app in the store yet.

              And that wasn’t an insult. I was being honest and I think you’re proving it. It’s a completely different world. I’m eager to see how the android switch to 64-bit goes, whenever they all get around to that.

            • Xennex1170

              Wow.. Thanks for the long reply… When I was going on about the 3 points I was simply replying to your replies as if they were in relation to the last most recent reply I made.. ‘Shrunk to fit with black borders on top/bottom’ I meant in landscape mode sorry didn’t make that evident. Perhaps should have said ‘black borders on long edges of screen’. I didn’t mean it as a headache of any kind.. Just curious how the OS would handle/display such an app if say you installed via say sideloading. Or during developing you happen to push the 5S screen formatted app into an older device. I’ve never said any user would ever encounter it themselves. I just wanted to know for curiosity sake since I don’t develop for iOS myself. As for Android switch to 64-bit, I don’t think it will be much of an event since I foresee only the JVM level and lower actually having to change leaving the Apps requiring no changes unless they happen to use more direct methods of accessing the HW.

      • Grammar Nazi

        *except

        • Franc012

          Thank you Grammar Nazi, I totally missed that. Damn, that’s embarrassing!

    • Ryan Castle

      An Android manufacturer (Samsung) announces an octa core processor
      “So innovative! This will change the world”

      Apple announces 64-bit OS
      “Lol we don’t need 64-bit Apple sucks.

      Don’t you guys think it’s a bit immature to hate on Apple for no reason?

      • Xennex1170

        Perhaps the difference is 64-bit architecture is more common in the computing world than an octo-processor. Personally having an relatively rare 8-core tech in a mobile device and actually demonstrating use seems more impressive to me.

      • viaimages

        Android is very different then iOS.. whereas it can run 10x more applications at the same time than the latter. so Octa Core makes more sense then on an iDevice

        • Alex Zhao

          How many cores do you have on your computer cpu? Most pc users can’t even take advantages of i7 4 cores and 8 threads.

          • viaimages

            me: 1x, 2x, 4x for both mobile/PC.

            ..on a Note 2 there is an average of around 25+ or so (depending on how many apps people normally use) processes running at the same time, + if you are an intensive power multi-tasking User, Android gives you that option to do so. I can switch back and forth between 5, 10, 20, 30 apps, if I need to and be as productive as I want.. With iDevices, you can only load a max of 3-4 apps before it slows down and starts shutting down not immediately used apps.

            I don’t believe it’s a matter of which device everyone should ultimately own. I believe Android and iOS appeal to totally different types of situations and what people need or want to do with it. Each has their merits, and both have their down-falls.

        • Grammar Nazi

          *than

    • Spruce Cycle

      Mobile 64bit will come into its own when the last gains to be made defending the dead pc industry fall flat and the OEMs have no choice but to invest fully in tablets.

      That’s when, as if by magic, the full productivity of the desktop will make its appearance on our mobile devices with Samsung leading the way.

      • viaimages

        the PC industry is not dead

        • Spruce Cycle

          Excuse, me, yes ur right, it’s vibrant and healthy with shipments year over year doubling and even tripling in many cases. Andorid is a niche OS that has a long way to go before the majority of computers users even begin contemplate using it.

          GTFO.

          • viaimages

            let’s agree to disagree. I believe Android appeals to PC and Linux users as a companion device to be more productive while still having the ability to transfer/use data easily between each other.

    • http://spacewater.us/ juicy

      Not Innovative? Well these guys think 64-bit mobile processors are a big and important step for mobile and server computing, even going so far as saying:

      “One of the biggest changes to mobile computing will take place next year, with the advent of 64-bit ARM based processors.”

      http://www.androidauthority.com/64-bit-processors-4gb-memory-coming-2014-267402/

      Or do you disagree with Gary’s post from this morning?

      • Piyush

        its nate , he is biggest anti-apple i have ever seen.

      • APai

        innovative is not something that’s fairly predictable. sure, 64 bit computing is pretty important. but it’s not something that ONLY apple could do. by claiming 64bit as innovative – apple is running out of marketing words. sure, they called dibs on it. but its besides the point.

        really. what about moving to 64bit is innovation ?

        • viaimages

          i wonder if they put a patent on it

          • APai

            you never know given what they think of rounded corners!

          • Grammar Nazi

            Bad joke. Do you even know the basics of patenting? Its ARM’s architecture, apple just bought a licence to use it.

            • Grammar Nazi

              *it’s.

            • http://spacewater.us/ juicy

              Wrong. If you actually learned what Apple has done with their chips you’d be better informed. They custom hand-drew the whole thing, and for the details go over to Ars Technica and find out.

              From the A6 wikipedia page:

              “a 1.3 GHz[5] custom Apple-designed ARMv7 based dual-core CPU,[6] called Swift,[3] rather than a licensed CPU from ARM like in previous designs, and an integrated triple-core PowerVR SGX 543MP3[1] graphics processing unit (GPU).”

      • Tcv4

        I feel like apple brought a mediocre 64bit processor to the market though (maybe as powerful as a snapdragon 600). Next year’s quad core 64 bit cpus will be in a whole different league.

      • Skander

        Releasing a 64bit processor with 1GB of RAM and mediocre specs is useless for now – the A50 range of processors is already 64bit, they’re not in actual products yet but they are nearing the date as we approach high ram like the Note 3 with 3gb of ram.

      • Lee

        We are using 64 bit window 7 for almost five years.It’s not innovation rather implementation of existing system.

    • Bone

      Greatest innovation by NSA ever.

      Haven’t been booked at a police station yet? Have no fear, fingerprint data is here, and you’re in our system before you know it.

      • Michael

        fingerprint data doesn’t leave the device

        • Ivan Myring

          That’s what THEY say

          • Michael

            Yes, you people are all turning into weird paranoid Luddites.

        • APai

          but this is NSA we are talking about. they’ve got it all covered.

        • http://iamzb.com/ Andres Quintana

          wait who said that? oh that’s right Apple

          • Michael

            This secure technology was created by ARM

        • Andrew Carpenter

          They actually had a section on one of the mobile websites the other day saying that blackberry and apple are giving your info to the government so it’s definitely believable

          • Michael

            The NSA has direct access to Google’s servers, so nothing else really matters anymore. This secure enclave stuff is new technology from ARM, not Apple. Read up on it and you’ll be impressed.

        • http://petercast.net Peterson Silva

          If the system is closed, how could you know? ;)

          • Michael

            I’ve educated myself instead of made claims out of ignorance. ARM has been working on this technology for years.

            • http://petercast.net Peterson Silva

              Instead of making*
              It doesn’t matter if the technology is available. If ARM has been working on that, then great, it’s possible, I don’t doubt that, and I haven’t. What I’m saying is iOS is closed. You or any other independent researcher can not look into its code and check if that actually happens. I’m making a case for open source here, that’s the point.

        • http://petercast.net Peterson Silva

          If the system is closed, how could you know? ;)

      • Richard

        I take your point, but I’m not sure that one of ten finger/thumb prints, captured by an iPhone, is enough to catch criminals.

        • APai

          that’s besides the point – catching criminals has never been the agenda of NSA, keeping tabs of the civilian population is. NSA/ TSA/ etc have you seen how atrociously power drunk both of these agencies are ?

    • joser116

      By patina, do you mean plateau?

      • http://iamzb.com/ Andres Quintana

        I think he meant patina as like a new paint (patina) that will fade fast

    • Xavier_NYC

      Fingerprint scanning is more gimmick than useful. .

      • Michael

        This will be a game changer as more payment systems roll out that accept it. In a year or two, you’ll be buying things in stores with just a tap. If you have an iPhone.

        • Xavier_NYC

          Android already lets you pay with your phone. It’s call NFC, which the IPhone still doesn’t have.

          • gommer strike

            And NFC isn’t supported everywhere. Yet(?). The big payment processors don’t seem to be all onboard with enabling NFC support at all checkout counters everywhere you look.

            It’s just not as ubiquitous as a credit card and it needs to get there. If not NFC, then just something.

            • Ugo Marceau

              The ideal would be an NFC/fingerprint scanner combo.
              Bring your phone up to the NFC tag, tap your finger on the phone to verify that it’s really you buying something. and of you go.

            • gommer strike

              Just one little issue with that. your fingerprint would have to be validated against the NFC, yes? Who, or what – gets to store that fingerprint data?

            • Michael

              The fingerprint is checked against the secure enclave in the A7. A True or False message is passed based on the check out to any app that needs to know.

            • Michael

              it will be BLE/fingerprint scanner combo

          • Michael

            NFC won’t be relevant until it’s in the iPhone, and it’s looking more and more like it’ll never be included — NFC might already be obsolete when compared to iBeacon and paypal’s beacon solution. These operate on BLE, not NFC.

      • Love Hope

        It’s something 70% percent of iPhone users will probably use. Only very people I know of turn on the gimmicks of their S4.

        • abazigal

          If it’s reliable and accurate enough, I see myself using the fingerprint scanner every chance I get. It would certainly be more convenient than press button, followed by swipe to unlock, and keying in passcode.

    • Michael

      Who cares about innovative when you reliably get Impressive?

      • APai

        apple/ sony/ samsung – all fit into that category – all of them had their ups and downs, through the years – but all 3 are doing pretty darn good, sony not so much, but they just got their mojo back.

    • Cesar Marte

      Ummm.. Why is there Iphone news on an Android site..?? Did I miss a name change guys..???

      • Spruce Cycle

        How can one be an “Android Authority” without knowing what the competition is up to?

        *rolls eyes* wow some ppl PREFER ignorance….

        • Cesar Marte

          well there is no competition, just refer them to the sister site and save the sarcasm for the Sheep

    • Michael

      haters gon’ hate and it’s deeeeelish!

    • joser116

      All I want is for Android to be as smooth, optimized, consistent and responsive as iOS

      • Spruce Cycle

        Sorry can’t happen. You can add gobs of RAM to Android and it will still stutter; that’s the compromise that Google made when they pivoted Android, a key-based system, to the touchscreen mobile arena.

        That said, it is possible to have a “good enough” non-lag experience with Android (as all the flagships demonstrate) but Android’s strengths lie not at its slickness but at its versatility and open, non-sandboxed nature.

        That compromise is more than worth it in my opinion.

        • APai

          actually, i’ve never found stutter with nova + stock. it’s smooth as butter even on lowly mediatek based processors / cheap phones. whereas I did get stutters on my expensive sony phone with it’s UI

          • Spruce Cycle

            Quite true. I think 4.0 eliminated most of the elements that caused lagging and stuttering.

            • joser116

              Just a thought,II tried my friend’s phone with Ginger bread an it had inferior specs than my phone with Android4.0.4, but her phone is faster O.O

            • Skander

              You have a shitty phone, or running a non stock version of Android.

            • joser116

              Nope, I am running stock Android4.0.4. Her phone has inferior specs than mine but hers still opens apps faster and is smooth.Plus, m

            • Skander

              That is near impossible, what phone are you using?
              Gingerbread is literally the slowest shit ever – are you using a custom developer port of 4.0.4 ?
              Only stock versions supplied properly by manufacturers (nexus or google edition phones) with correct drivers can judge pure Android.

            • joser116

              I am using the Kyocera Hydro. She was using the LG Optimus V. Her phone has an 800Mhz processor, mine is a Snapdragon that is better than the one from the Nexus One, slightly. My phone is running the latest stock version of ICS, just with a couple added MyAccount apps from Boost and added feature Eco Mode, which just lowers brightness and disables some features like vibration and such and lowers screen timeout. Everything else is completely stock. Trust me, I am an Android geek. That is the reason for why I bought this phone. I was also surprised that her phone was slicker than mine o.o. LG really seems to optimize their phones, as it seems I am not the only one that has experienced this O.o P.S. Her phone was definitely not running stock Android and definitely had more bloat. My guess is that Gingerbread is just less resource intensive. I can just imagine how fast Gingerbread will run on a high-end phone from today.

            • Spruce Cycle

              This was the case to with my old LG Optimus Slider on 2.3.4 vs the HTC One V on 4.0 while the One V was smoother I was surprised at how fast the 2011 Gingerbread device was especially the stock browser.

              I don’t have an answer for this one…

            • joser116

              My friend’s phone was also an LG Optimus. It must be that LG is a good optimizer.

            • APai

              maybe there were less services that run in the background on the GB, whereas the system overheads on the JB is much much more, making the older hw + gb look faster

            • Spruce Cycle

              Perhaps because when I did a search ppl noting that GB is faster than ICS was quite a common occurence but yah i believe ur correct.

            • APai

              maybe latency issues with software may not be overcome by simple linear increase in hardware power/ capacity ?

              add to it heterogeneous network/ hardware implementations – so scaling might not be linear. optimizations need to happen at multiple levels for different use cases. i think hardware and software have been getting more complicated all the while.

              most people don’t even stop to ponder – they want faster/ better/ cheaper all at once :)

            • Spruce Cycle

              I personally feel that ICS was abit of a pig and GB was simply leaner. Jelly Bean esp. 4.2.2 smoothed everything out.

            • APai

              agreed, JB is much much smoother better than ics

            • viaimages

              yep, Gingerbread is a lot lighter than Jelly Bean.. battery-wise as well.

            • joser116

              That’s why Google still has some optimizing left to do :)

            • viaimages

              i agree.. however, JB is like Windows 7 Ultimate on how much power it needs to actually run it.. so if you have only the absolute minimum hardware requirements running JB, obviously it is going to stutter and Force Close software.

            • joser116

              Excellent. I did think of that.

            • viaimages

              I understand your concern, but that bug you speak of is not isolated to just the S4. it has to do with the relationship between Jelly Bean and the Touchwiz UX in the scaling of animation transitions. If you want, you have the option to turn off or drop down to a lower scale effect to increase efficiency should you need it. Go to Settings / Developer Options (if you upgraded to 4.2+ you won’t be able to see Dev options, Google how to enable it).. then either turn off or downgrade to the lowest setting for: Windows Animation Scale, Transition Animation Scale, and Animator Duration Scale. When I upgraded my SG S2 from Gingerbread to Jelly Bean this was a problem for me as well.

            • APai

              I am not so sure. as OS matures, we expect a lot more, and ALL the hardware improvement still amount to the same we had with earlier hw+sw combo.
              early symbian devices lacked anti aliasing, dint run a ton of services, the hw then was pretty ordinary compared to what we have now. – it was the best available then.

              I’m afraid this constant tug of war between our increasing expectations and the HW race will continue, until we hit a plateau like the desktop. can’t wait to get there :P

            • Skander

              That’s why I have high hopes for Tizen, time for Android to get some real competition, this will benefit both sides and push for faster innovation.

            • Spruce Cycle

              Indeed, I am really interested to see what Samsung does there.

          • joser116

            Androiddoes not stutter a lot and it’s responsive enough, it’s just that it is not as true buttery smooth, responsive, and slick as iOS. 

            • abazigal

              Problem is that stock android as we know hardly exists outside of the Nexus phones released by Google. Every other OEM will invariably slap their own skins on it and differentiate themselves from the competition, which invariably leads to a more bloated and laggier user experience, especially if they ship the phone with less specs to cut costs.

              So many Stock Android is buttery smooth, but what’s the point when so few people are actually using it?

        • joser116

          I know :)

        • Alex Zhao

          I agree

      • APai

        Holo design language has already got developers fine tuning their apps for a more consistent experience. I find stock android to be smooth, consistent and responsive. of course it still needs work, but that’s the price you have to pay for extensibility/ flexibility. in many ways android is a different beast altogether than the very tightly controlled IOS – and if you are looking to get IOS in android – it’s a mistake, you are better off with IOS and its closed ways.

        • Spruce Cycle

          Excellent points.

        • joser116

          Android has never been as consistent as it is today, but I just don’t like that it is not as consistent as iOS

          • bene

            android is just not as long lasting as
            ios, most of the apps just arent optimized well; one
            year ago 1gb ram was enough on my gn,
            now it takes like 10 seconds to up facebook and have trouble even navigating the homescreens. on the other hand my 2 and a half year old ipad 2 is still as snappy as it used to be when i first got it in 2011, and can still run any of the latest graphic heavy games with no problem at all. while we cant predict how long the new android phones can last, i can only say from my past experiences with ios devices, ios devices have a longer usable life if you will.

      • viaimages

        sure. i think we all want a smooth, optimized, and consistent experience. However, iOS is not without it’s fair share of crashing.. the operating system just handles it differently

        • joser116

          True, both crash. Its just that Android notifies the user when a crash occurs and Apple does not. The app just closes and makes users think that it was their fault and that they accidentally pressed the home button.

          • viaimages

            Exactly :)

            • joser116

              I am just being hopeful that Android 5 presents some kind of overhaul to not just remedy the problem like Project Butter does, but to eradicate it. Who knows what the geniuses at Google will pull off.

            • Masson Liang

              I’m curious to know what device you’re currently using.

              I am using HOX evita on CM10.1 RC2 with Apex Launcher and TRIM and have had an incredible, smooth and responsive experience. No issues or complaints on my end.

      • Collin dubya

        It is, just dont’ go get a shitty cheap low end phone.

    • seyss

      you asian-phone lovers are a bunch of hypocrites. first you release an article praising 64-bit now you say it is not important?

      keep giving money overseas to dog-eaters……

      • Nick

        And, the most racist comment of the day goes to….

      • Shin Washida

        This is not a reason to insult his origin. But what is a rascite just do it on a website or there’s different origins that desteste.

      • gommer strike

        …and where’s the Iphone made in?

        • seyss

          kid, there’s more to a phone than assembling it. there’s design (brains) which is the vast majority of the work and it is done in the US.

          • Skander

            If you want to mention hardware design, which is the actual brains, Apple makes nothing of it, Sony makes the display, various components are by Qualcomm and the Processor, RAM and many other components are made by Samsung.

          • gommer strike

            kid, how many other companies print “designed in california” – take a look at the IKEA furniture you got there – oh oh oh DESIGNED IN SWEDEN, yes? But then you see MADE IN CHINA.

            back in your court

            • seyss

              what? go back to your cave

            • gommer strike

              it’s cold in here, but at least I’ve got good ol’ Alfred serving me tea :P

            • gommer strike

              it’s cold in here, but at least I’ve got good ol’ Alfred serving me tea :P

    • james blunt

      Maybe I should consider this iphone 5S for my re contract list with the Galaxy Note 3 . No Sony or LG or Nexus for me cus I hate stocks and the sony UI really sucks . After comparing the Note 3 to the iphone I will see which is better in terms of overall performance handling . Screen size is not an issue because I am currently using a Note 2 still fast enough to do what I need.

    • Cristi13

      Ok, so quad core is useless, 1080p is useless, 64-bit is useless, what’s next? Phones are useless?

      • APai

        I hope it comes to that. no one asks which PC/ Laptop you use (only apple fans do, with macbook air or something like that). I hope all of this gets commoditized and we get along with our business.

    • james blunt

      Simply – just put a Intel Core i7 Extreme edition Haswel chipset into my phone and you all are gonna shut up and I will show my i7 phone and brag about it and you can’t win because I have a i7 and its way more powerful than yours snappy 800 and Octa core . But of course , it will heat up and burn my trousers .

    • Mike Bastable

      Well Android Authority has now lost ALL credibility following this “article”.
      Innovation is always innovation. Being first is: being first.

      Well done Apple.

      Android will of course follow, soon hopefully into the 64-bit arena, if the Kit Kat OS becomes 64bit.
      The sour grapes shown here are petulant and silly.
      Nate:

      Apple is NOT a danger to Android market share, which will remain dominant. Today was about China and choice to some extent…however next week sees the launch of a new iOS: that is the real news: across the board, non fragmented handset support for all recent models and processors that fundamentally change and update all users handsets.

      I have an Xperia Z recently updated to the new Android version, 50% of my friends have Androids, from LG, HTC and others all running old software with little or no support from the manufacturers…THAT is the current Android problem, not anything Apple does.
      Sony advertise Mac support in Holland. To actually update my Z, i had to install Windows on my Mac, because the Sony Mac software did not work!

      There is a great article to be written about awful OEM support for the Android platform, just take a look at LG if you need motivation. Google is amazing, Android is amazing…however 6 months down the line our new handsets are old news. When Google launches a new OS it is a lottery if yours will be updated (even if it is a flagship device)…just look at the LG/HTC 3d debacle).
      Nate your knowledge of Android, and your passion for Android is apparent, put it to good use!, kick the poor support situation into focus with some good Android articles, and stop this silly obsession with kicking Apple…it is a waste of your talents.

      • APai

        calling dibs on something routine isnt innovation. Nate is absolutely right – it’s impressive, but NOT innovation. that – fingerprint scanner finally redeemed that waste of space home button

    • Spruce Cycle

      I probably am the only developer here, so my opinion carries more weight. Plus I am a frog.

    • deepen03

      64-bit makes sense on a desktop OS.. not on a mobile phone.

    • mrjayviper

      the apple-centric website I go to rarely talks about major android phone/tablet releases but it’s the other way around with android centric websites. numerous article on Apple when it has nothing to do with android. And mostly, the author’s are just preaching to the choir.

      full disclosure: I’ve had a 4s and ipad3 but have move on to a note2 and TF700. and planning to get TF701 once that comes out.

      • APai

        why is it that cook and others need to constantly show how much better they are than every other OS out there ? they are pretty selective about it too. android is like democracy – there are no control points (few if they exist), it’s noisy and there’s plenty of debate – and usually there’s much more innovation coming out than what apple advertizes

        • abazigal

          It’s called marketing. Or what did you think Samsung was showing with those ads of theirs?

          • APai

            rhetorical

    • kirev

      64-bit in mobile is impressive.. perhaps. we don’t know yet until seeing real-world performance/ comparison.
      I hope with 64-bit I can finally play dolphin emulator full speed on my phone :)

    • joser116

      Nate Swanner, change your profile picture, you look depressed.

    • Alex Kon

      Primary camera
      8 MP, 3264Ă—2448 pixels, autofocus, dual LED flash (one cool, one warm), simultaneous HD video and image recording, touch focus, geo-tagging, face detection, panorama, HDR

      Battery
      Li-Po 1440 mAh

      Apple A7 chipset (64-bit)
      dual-core CPU

      RAM
      TBC (probably 1GB)

      64bit processor on a 1GB ram!!!!!!!!!!!! its fkcing funny!

    • Rana

      There was a time when phones were playing catch up with iPhone, now its the other way around!!!!!

    • Balraj

      Let’s wait for benchmark…
      Don’t get to conclusions….

      • joser116

        It will probably be really good. I am interested in GPU comparisons between this and Snapdragon 800.

    • Ruz

      Big deal.. I still use Windows XP 32x

      • joser116

        Awesome, me too. I love it! :D

    • jumbo3220

      Trolling people at it’s best iPhone 5C (cheap/crap) is 549$ and 32 gig version is 649$ out of contract and still mindle… i mean mind loyal customers will buy it. No way Apple can hit the mid/low end market. Android dominates high-end,mid-range and low-end

      • abazigal

        What makes you think Apple was ever intending to hit the low end market?

    • Simon

      Im so surprised over how many people there are that doesn’t know that this piece of shit isn’t even the first 64bit cpu phone, one would think atleast someone would react to this fact o.O http://blog.laptopmag.com/hands-on-with-the-worlds-fastest-smartphone-the-huawei-ascend-d-quad

    • Lance Lee

      I see it now. the new nexus 5 with the cortex a50 and android 4.4 running kitkat

    • dugadug

      this literally makes all current android phones obsolete. for sure next gen android phones will try to incorporate a 64bit chip just for the sake of customers wanting the safety blanket of their device being future proof. when android finally goes from 32bit to 64bit. whether it’s a note 3 or a z1 that was released this month. it will be obsolete.

      • muhamaad

        True dat

      • APai

        hey dug,
        it’s ARM that’s releasing the architecture. it was pretty well known that 64bit was on its way. perhaps apple added it anyways, since android (samsung et al) were going to release this. so let’s add this anyways, we’ll have dibs on it. lol.

    • inkflow

      Having a 64-bit without more than 4GB of RAM is simply worthless.

      You will get no speedup and your applications will consume more memory. The major difference between a 64-bit and a 32-bit is the address space. Everything else is negligible.

      • abazigal

        Won’t applications actually take up less space? I know when I migrated to Snow Leopard on my Mac (which was 64-bit) and suddenly found myself with like 8gb of extra hard disk space. Think something about needing less space to store data and calculations and stuff.

        • inkflow

          64-bit CPU use 64 bits to describe a memory address (instead of 32 bits on a 32-bit CPU). That’s it! It has nothing to do with efficiency or speed in any direct way.

          Essentially you can describe data exactly the same way on a 32-bit and a 64-bit CPU. However, pointer size on a 64-bit CPU is twice the size of a pointer on a 32-bit CPU. Since virtually all data structures use pointers and use them in abundance, 64-bit processes consume more memory. Code size on a 64-bit CPU is not smaller, what you experienced with your Mac is not related directly to 64-bit. (I know Apple used to provide fat binaries – 64 and 32 under the same execution file. Maybe what you experienced is due to the removal of the 32 bit part from the executables).

    • abazigal

      Many people deride this move by Apple as being gimmicky, believing that 64-bit processing is ultimately pointless without at least 4gb of ram.

      However, aren’t we forgetting that this is Apple we are talking about, a company who has historically been very conservative about boosting specs, and yet has a proven track record of being able to eke out impressive performance out of limited specs?

      Remember the first ipad, which ran a single core processor and 256 mb of ram, yet still managed to offer a smooth and responsive user experience. Heck, their phones are still using dual-core processors, yet continue to offer great performance.

      Conversely, who can forget how Samsung released their S2 phone with a dual-core processor. Sounds impressive, until you realise that it still ran gingerbread, which supported only single-core operations. This was the perfect example of a meaningless spec bloat for the sake of bragging rights, because consumers didn’t benefit one bit.

      This alone shows that specs, while important, are not the be-all and end-all of what makes a great device. It also shows that creating a great user experience is more than just throwing a bunch of specs together and expecting them to somehow “just work”.

      Maybe the entire mobile landscape will eventually migrate over to 64-bit computing. That’s not the point. The point is how readily this can be done. In this aspect, I feel that Apple, because of its closed ecosystem, and their tight control over its hardware and software development, is well-poised to make that transition far quickly and efficiently than Android can. Likely, they only need to snap their fingers, and their veritable army of app developers will be falling over themselves to port their apps over to 64-bit.

      Conversely, I see quite a few years of chaos for Android, mainly because app updates may not always reach the end user, and Google has no control over how OEMs choose to manufacture their devices (much less support 64-bit). Without this critical mass, app developers may not feel incentivised to code 64-bit applications.

      What’s my point again? I don’t really care for whether a feature is impressive or innovative, but rather, how useful it is for me in my everyday usage. If Apple is able to pull this transition off seamlessly, and consumers benefit from significantly-improved performance in their IOS devices, to me, how is that a bad thing, even if it is not necessarily innovative?

    • Joshua Lim

      Since the announcement of this. I guess that Google will take almost month’s or even a year to release a so called 4.4 or 5.0 version. But until then. IOS will have over a tens of thousands of apps by the time of it’s release. Even if Samsung announce a 64 bit tablet and a so called sgsV. There’s no proof that a 4.3 can run on 64 bit with a single floating point. Otherwise, it will become an unbalanced platform.

    • Anonymous Anonymous

      I know I’m stepping into enemy territory here (though I’ve owned 7 Android devices, 1 window & 2 iPhones), but I must say, the Apple hate is weirdly high school-ish. I mean, I could get technical, but who gives a crap? People like Android and people like Apple. They are in two different worlds to me. Like an Apple (no pun intended), trying to prove why it tastes better than an orange. I just love that out of the box, my iPhone does what it’s supposed to do, and it has a strong community of developers behind it for UMPH! And I loved my Android for its diversity and ability to change. But I realized, I could care less about changing my font, customizing my text or making it faster. I love both platforms for what they contribute, but Apples stability and community won my vote. So instead of belittling the novice and experienced Apple lovers, just say hey… Do you! And I’ll do the same. Tron on!

    • cee

      ‘roid-ragers are funny, you call people who by Apple products sheep, but you are the ones buying more Shitsung phones, from a company who spend 9.5x on marketing, lie about performance, try taking the piss out of people queuing and desperatly try to get people to queue for a joke ÂŁ300 watch.

      Who’s falling for bullshit? Oh, and don’t forget, S4 is rrp’ed at the same price as a iPhone, so Shitsumg is making more out of you than Apple.

      64-bit with no 64-bit apps, yes only Android can do this, Apple have proven that they can supply the tools to devs and earnings to make it worth their while, why, because 5% of Apple users pirate software, 95% of apps are pirated on Android. You claim to be ‘personalising your phone’, what that really means is ‘I don’t want to pay 69p for an app.

      Carry on buying your wish-it-were an iPhone, I find it funny.

      Android Kit-Kat to be followed by Android Hatorade 64-bit, without a single app in 64-bit.

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