Propelled by flagships, KitKat now on 8.5% of Android devices

May 3, 2014

    Samsung Galaxy S5 android 4.4 kitkat 2

    April has been a great month for KitKat, with the latest version of Google’s operating system growing 3.5 percentage points, powered by the launch of several high-profile Android flagships.

    In Google’s platform version statistics for the week ending May 1, Android 4.4 KitKat is now at 8.5 percent, while the bulk of devices checking in the Play Store ran Jelly Bean versions, with a combined share of 60.5 percent.

    Ice Cream Sandwich and the stubborn Gingerbread continued their slow descent towards oblivion, though, combined, the two aging versions of Android still hold just under 30 percent.

    Google includes in this snapshot devices that ran the latest Play Store app, thus excluding devices such as the Kindle Fire line, the Nokia X, and many devices sold in developing countries.

    android distribution numbers may 2014

    Looking at the similar stats from April and March, KitKat’s growth is quite consistent, with the version going from 2.5 percent to 8.5 percent in just two months. The jump is owed to the release of new versions of popular series like the Galaxy S, HTC One, and Sony Xperia. The Galaxy S5 in particular enjoyed a wide release in 125 countries, and, if Samsung is to be believed, it was welcomed enthusiastically by consumers. Likewise, the HTC One launched in the US and around the world in the first week of April, while Sony’s Xperia Z2 became available this week in Europe and parts of Asia.

    But it’s not just new high-end devices contributing to the growth of KitKat. Big Android OEMs released updates to some of their devices in the measured interval, while mid-rangers such as the HTC Desire 816 and Desire 610 also added to KitKat’s numbers.

    Comments

    • MirandaDSchuler

      Ice Cream Sandwich and the stubborn Gingerbread continued their slow descent towards oblivion, though, combined, the two aging versions of Android still hold just under 30 percent. http://qr.net/xSqi

    • Juan A C

      Here in Argentina Samsung and LG are still selling some Gibgerbread phones. They are very cheap of course so they get sold like candy… It’s going to take a while to exterminate GB haha

      • Juan A C

        Actually, I just checked and LG no longer sells any GBs. So the award goes solely to Samsung ;)

    • John-Phillip Saayman

      My s3 jumped to 4.3 this month and I got a Note which I updated to Kitkat so I helped.. Hehe

    • Guest123

      Well, mine is scheduled to get it soon, though I doubt AT&T cares much however, I won’t be upgrading to 4.4 — the removal of text reflow/wrapping from webview kills 4.4, that’s a must have feature and until it’s back in Android I’ll be staying behind. And no, I’m not using Opera just because google is being a douche nozzle about text reflow.

    • Mur

      The secret honeycomb sect lives on!

      • Alu Zeros

        funny

      • Jayfeather787

        Barely. With like 5 people still using it.

    • number29

      Now if only they could make it a decent OS…

    • Jayfeather787

      16% still on gingerbread. Ugh.
      Root your phones people!!!
      Or get rid of the Chinese garbage that you bought which probably has gingerbread, cannot be updated, will not be updated, cannot be rooted, and has no ROMs because it is a Mediatek piece of crap.
      NEXUS FTW!!!

      • K2

        Ginger bread is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better than ICS or soemtimes even JB on phones with low specs.

    • Amit

      And those Moto G selling like hot cakes are much more in percentage than total flagships..

    • Walt Del

      KitKat needs MUCH work…..and if you want to keep your privacy …DO NOT upgrade….I

      • Magnetic1

        I was wondering when someone will let me know what kitkat brings to the table.
        Thanks. Now I know where google is headed in terms of their meaning of progress.

    • Sal

      How are people still on froyo? Can they not afford to upgrade their phone or what? I hope by next year it is gone from the graph but it will likely still be there.

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