Amazon to allow ‘Special Offers’ opt-out for Kindle Fire HD for $15

September 9, 2012
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Amazon recently launched its latest line of Kindle tablets and e-readers, with the Kindle Fire HD as the flagship product. The e-commerce company is positioning its tablets in the lower-range of the price spectrum to better compete against the likes of the Google Nexus 7. In exchange, though, the tablets will display “Special Offers” on the lock screen and at the bottom of the screen on select pages.

There has been some concern over news that Amazon would not be allowing any opt-outs from ads on all new models of the Kindle Fire, particularly since the $499 Kindle Fire HD 4G LTE is not exactly selling for an entry-level price as PCMag‘s Jamie Lendino puts it.

Now TechCrunch says that Amazon has confirmed they are allowing buyers to opt out of the “Special Offers” feature (which is a spiffy name for on-screen advertising).

We know from our Kindle reader line that customers love our special offers and very few people choose to opt out. We’re happy to offer customers the choice.

This comes with a one-time payment of $15 for the life of the device, which ensures you no longer get any ads. In comparison, Amazon used to charge $30 to opt-out of Special Offers on the original e-ink Kindle.

Is $15 a fair price to pay to opt out of Amazon’s special offers? Or should you be seeing ads in the first place, given that you’ve paid $499 for a Kindle Fire HD?

Comments

  • hnldriver

    If you’re already paying for the device – it should be ad free to start and you should be able to ‘opt-in’ for that sorta thing…

  • paxmos

    What a rip off..Just don’t buy the thing…Why pay $15 for ads that I never asked for. I hate companies like this and their practices as such.

  • anon

    Whatever happened to OWNING your device. Ads should never come into contact with it unless I choose so. So instead they offer my OWNERSHIP hostage for $15. Bull$hit. I will take my cash elsewhere.

  • troll

    Just because a consumer is lazy does not mean they LOVE it.
    “We know from our Kindle reader line that customers love our special
    offers and very few people choose to opt out. We’re happy to offer
    customers the choice.”

    FIXED
    “Since we know many consumers will tolerate it, or are too lazy, or cheap to pay the fee, we are ecstatic to find a new way to rip them off and milk more profit”