Addicted to your mobile? You may be nomophobic

September 26, 2012
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smartphone people Siegfried Lundberg/Flickr

I’m going to guess if you’re on Android Authority that you’re probably a little nomophobic. Let’s face it, anyone who attends AA is an addict. The term nomophobia was created by British researchers in 2008 to describe a fear of losing access to mobile technology. If you feel a pang of anxiety when your Android smartphone goes missing then you could be a sufferer.

A survey of 1,000 British workers sponsored by SecurEnvoy found that 66 percent of people fear losing or being without their mobile phone. It also discovered that 41 percent had two or more phones to reduce the risk of being cut off.

There was a US study of 1,000 workers by Good Technology in July that found the average American first checks their phone at 7.09AM, usually while still in bed, and that 69 percent won’t go to sleep without a final work email check.

The Morningside Recovery Center in California is a drug and alcohol recovery facility, but it has added nomophobia to its list of conditions treated. It is placing mobile phone addiction on a par with alcohol and drug addiction in terms of the powerful dependence people can build up and the fact that they may need help to overcome it.

Do you obsessively check your smartphone? Do you worry about the battery running out? Do you use your phone at the dinner table, in the car, or on the toilet? Well, you’re probably an addict, but don’t worry because you’re in good company.

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