64-bit processors and 4GB of memory coming in 2014

September 10, 2013

android-logo-with-64-bitsAs 2013 is slowly drawing to a close ARM has been tantalizing us with the prospects for 2014. One of the biggest changes to mobile computing will take place next year, with the advent of 64-bit ARM based processors. Although Intel does have a slight lead in bringing 64 bit computing to Android, the real benefits will come when ARM releases its Cortex-A57 and Cortex-A53 processors.

The move to 64-bit means two things for ARM, first it means it can offer processors with an up to 50% performance improvement over existing 32-bit Cortex-A15 processors. Second it means that ARM can force its way into the server room.

The Cortex-A57 and Cortex-A53 processors are designed to be used in a similar way to the current Cortex-A7 and Cortex-A15 processors and can be joined together in a big.LITTLE configuration, think Exynos 5420 but with 64-bits. But the real magic behind the Cortex-50 series is that they are backwards compatible and can run existing 32-bit applications ARMv7 applications.

However when in 64-bit mode the Cortex-A50 series processors offer increased performance due to the its 64-bit features which include 64-bit general purpose registers, that increase performance and reduces stack use; 64k pages, that reduce page miss rates and reduce the depth of page walks; and double precision floating point SIMDs, which will be mainly useful in High Performance Computing (HPC) setups.

Cortex-A15 vs Cortex-A57 performance

It isn’t yet known which version of Android will be fully 64-bit compatible, it is unlikely to be Android 4.4 KitKat but hopefully Android 5.0 will be able to fully utilize the new ARMv8 architecture. However the transition to 64-bits shouldn’t be too hard as Linux has supported 64-bit modes on Intel for a long time and earlier this year support for ARM64 started to appear in the mainline kernel.

And you're going to see a point in the next year or two years where 4GB is going to appear in smartphones and tablets.
James Bruce, ARM's lead mobile strategist.
CNET

The other interesting prospect for 2014 is devices with 4GB of RAM (or more). The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 already has 3GB of memory and the jumps from 1GB to 2GB to 3GB haven’t been that hard. Of course there is a valid argument against such large amounts of memory in a mobile device, however Samsung’s clever multi-windows software demonstrates that true multi-tasking is possible on a handheld device and with true multi-tasking comes the need for more memory. Likewise the increasing complexity of 3D games on Android also demonstrates the need for more memory, this time for use by the 3D subsystems.

To put this into context, there are many a good PC or laptop running Windows today that only have 2GB of memory and there are a multitude of graphics cards with memory measured in Gigabytes and not just Megabytes. The advent of smartphones and tablets with such large resources underlines where consumers are expecting to find their computing power.

How does this all sound to you, do you like the idea of a 64-bit Android device with 4GB of RAM?

Comments

  • jpgrms

    yup! if it runs ubuntu!

  • Gilles LeBlanc

    I think where aproaching a point of computing consolidation on our smart phones. In other words your smart phone is your telivision, internet, gaming system, communicator etc using wireless HDMI.

  • anGel_pLayer

    Can 64-bit processors support playing 10bit mkv without color artifacts? Also using the native players and not using apps like MX Player or others. MX can play 10bit mkvs but it has color artifacts, if you use S/W mode, it eliminates the artifacts but it sometimes stutter. Not really knowledgeable about these things. These are just my observation as a regular user.

  • MasterMuffin

    Nexus 6. That’s all I have to say. NEXUS 6 :)

    • Gilles LeBlanc

      Hells yea nexus 6 running stock android? I guess we wont need progress bars anymore lol. I wish they made Nexus “phablets” for 6.4 Giants like me :-( The weather sux up here withought nexus thanks for asking google..

      • MasterMuffin

        No, Nexus 6 running Sense x) That’s a good idea actually, phablet version of Nexus phones with a bigger screen (duh), bigger battery and maybe even a stylus!

        • Gilles LeBlanc

          Oh dude for sure, if Google optimized a phablet with multitasking functionality it would be epic. thanks for mentioning Sense X, I had no idea what that was.

        • Joachim Nilsson

          A stylus?
          No.

          • Guest

            I agree I hate stylus aswell. But allot of people love it so im pro stylus.

        • joser116

          You like Sense?

          • MasterMuffin

            Nope, just a joke

          • joser116

            BTW, what do you think will have 64-bit first, S5 or Note 4?

          • MasterMuffin

            Note 4, because by that time Android version that supports 64-bit will be introduced, S5 only if Kit Kat has 64-bit support (that’d be a big surprise!)

          • joser116

            I agree

    • Adam Outler

      Why are people even using the term Nexus 5? the “4″ references the size of the screen, just like the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10. The screen size of the current Nexus 4 is 4.7. why would they call 4.9 a nexus5 if they didn’t round up to 5 for the 4.7? Nexus6 is just plain silly.

      • joser116

        It just makes sense. It most probably will have a screen size close to 5 inches and, well, it will come after the Nexus 4, so Nexus 5 seems natural. Still, we don’t know the official name, but that is just an educated guess :) It might as well just have nothing to do with screen size as well. It is, after all, going to be the fifth generation Nexus phone. Its just a combination of the three. What better name to call it?

        • Adam Outler

          Considering the Nexus 7 came after the Nexus 7, that’s not an educates guess. That’s a guess based on your intuition. All nexus devices for the last year and a half have been named by screen size, and there’s 3-inches separating each name. 4-7-10. Nexus5 would break all the conventions Google established… Not saying its not possible, but calling it a Nexus5 sounds silly considering all other Nexus examples.
          The Nexus 4 came after both the N7 and the N10 and its screen size has been roundable to 5 since it came out, but Google truncates the remainder after the decimal. The new device will be a Nexus 4, 2013… If all traditions are observed.

          • joser116

            Going by your thoughts, your guess is also based on intuition. You have a very good point though.

          • Adam Outler

            That’s called evidence, not intuition.

          • joser116

            In that case, mine is evidence too.

          • Cal Rankin

            Then, by that logic, every Nexus would have been called the Nexus One. Every Nexus to date has been called something different. therefore, if all traditions are being reserved, it could be called the Nexus 5.

          • Adam Outler

            Reread my post.

          • Cal Rankin

            I did. It still insinuates that the next Nexus will still be called the Nexus 4 because that is the name of the Nexus that came before it. Granted, the screen size difference makes sense, but it could ultimately be a coincidence. The Nexus 7 (2013) is the first Nexus device to follow the naming scheme of renaming the device as the same moniker with the year tacked on. Every other Nexus phone has a different name: Nexus One, Nexus S, Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4. Therefore calling it the Nexus 5 is completely logical.

          • Adam Outler

            The only way makes sense is if they round 4.99 to 5… Which is entirely possible.. But 4.75 wasn’t rounded to 5 and an incremental naming convention is unsustainable, which is why they started naming by screen size.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            I have a N7 FHD and N4, you don’t think there going for a more phablet style Nexus phone. 4.7″ is too small, 7″ is too big, at least with reading glasses on. In the future we’re going UD, 64 bit, graphics RAM, 14 nm, will all help to keep heating down..

      • MasterMuffin

        Should I call it “the Nexus phone after the next Nexus phone” :)

        • joser116

          Isn’t it just “the next Nexus phone” since we are talking about “Nexus 5″?

          • MasterMuffin

            I was talking about Nexus 6

          • joser116

            oh I see

        • Adam Outler

          Try “2014 model”

          • joser116

            Google does not have a consistent naming scheme for its Nexus phones as we have seen. And we still cannot be sure that Google has a consistent naming scheme for its tablets, based on screen size, because we have only seen one sequel to one of its tablets. Nevertheless, it is more reasonable to call the next Nexus phone the Nexus 5 than to call it Nexus 4 2013 model because there is no precedent to rely on. Nexus phones do not have a history of a consistent naming scheme: Nexus One (3.7 inch), Nexus S (4.0 inch), Galaxy Nexus (4.69 inch), Nexus 4 (4.7 inch).

          • Adam Outler

            Actually, we have seen 4 instances of naming based on device size. Releasing a device with an arbitrary number incrementation would be silly… So in 3 years from now the phone would be called the same thing as the Nexus7 tablet? No. Googe names their devices based on screen size.

          • MasterMuffin

            Meh, Nexus 6 is shorter to write and everyone knows what I’m talking about when I say “Nexus 6″

          • Adam Outler

            All I’m saying is the revision has nothing to do with the number. It refers to the size of the devices. Saying Nexus 6, to anyone who is tracking the naming convention, says a 6″ Nexus device. If you check wth Google factory images, even they refer to the Nexus 7 by year-model.

          • MasterMuffin

            :sametextasinmypreviouscomment:

      • Michael T. Babcock

        Let’s see, because there was the G1, then the Nexus S, then the Galaxy Nexus, then the Nexus 4, making it the fourth device. Also, the screen is closer to 5 than 4 inches, so if you were right, Google would’ve likely already called it the Nexus 5.

  • Vardan Nazaretyan

    The Nexus phone after the Nexus 5 will have it hopefully!

    • joser116

      This seems like the talk of an iPhone sheep.

      • Vardan Nazaretyan

        Nope. I’m just saying that the SoC is newly introduced and they can’t pack it in a phone that will most likely come out in a month or less.

        • joser116

          I’m just saying cause that’s what an iPhone sheep would say when Androidhas a feature that iOS doesn’t have. They always say, “The next one will have it” Admit it ;)

          • Vardan Nazaretyan

            I’m clearly not an iSheep.

          • joser116

            I know you’re not, I’m just saying that’s something an iSheep would say. I’m just an Androidguy trying to see both sides of the story.

          • Vardan Nazaretyan

            Me neither.

    • joser116

      Probably Galaxy S5.

      • Vardan Nazaretyan

        GS5 will probably use an improved version of Exynos 5. Just like GS3 used an improved version of Exynos found on GS2(correct me if I’m wrong).

        • joser116

          But Exynos is based on ARM.

          • Vardan Nazaretyan

            I know, and I think, they’ll implement that tech in Exynos 6 (or whatever it’s going to be called) and introduce it with GS6 or GNote 5.

          • joser116

            Wouldn’t that be too far off? Samsung would obviously want to match Apple, and ARM did say that devices with their next big.LITTLE configuration will be available in 2014. We can completely rule out the GNote 5 because it will be released in 2015, which is way too far off. I think that GNote 4 or Galaxy S5 are safe bets. Samsung is going to need something new. And Samsung would want their Galaxy S5 to have it. If Apple already has it, why can’t the next Samsung flagship the Galaxy S5?

          • Vardan Nazaretyan

            The average consumer doesn’t care whether it’s a 64bit or 32bit CPU. And both of them target the average Joe. So why would Samsung spend additional $$$ for a 64bit CPU when the average consumer won’t care about the bit-ness(is this even a word?) of the CPU and buy it anyway?

          • joser116

            Yup, but we do :) And Apple’s announcement will probably make 64-bit more “well know” among iSheep O.O. And Samsung would just like to be as or better than Apple :/ They will surely try to beat Apple’s specs, they always do.

          • Vardan Nazaretyan

            But we are just a minority that not a single manufacturer cares about(well, besides HTC with the One Developer Edition).

          • joser116

            Well, they are always trying to match Apple. Apple has popularized 64-bit. By the way, I have added to my previous reply.

          • Vardan Nazaretyan

            Android actually supports 64bit, as far as I know.

          • Keg Man

            samsung still can go on the fact that it has 8 cores while apple has 2. that is enough alone to convince the non informed consumer. Plus, the carriers dont push iphones cause they make less money. And to be honest, who knows if the current quad core are faster than the 64bit which I suspect will be. I think note3 will be faster than the iphone 5s

          • joser116

            True, but that’s besidesthe point. Still, Samsung would like to match Apple’s specs.

          • Keg Man

            they probably will but from my homework, the OS needs to be written for 64bit and the phones wont see much of difference without a significant amount of ram so I dont expect samsung to be duplicating this soon unless its just for show like the note 3′s 4k camera

  • Bobby Wright

    I want a 64bit Android device NOW!!

    • Roberto Tomás

      why?

      • Bobby Wright

        I can answer your question with a question. why not?

      • joser116

        lol

  • Ivan Myring

    Now I don’t know if I should get a note 3!

    • neuroh

      I am with you on that one, was going to get an Xperia Z1 instead of optimus g but now I am tempted to just wait a year.

  • Acaa Aca

    exciting. wished ubuntu edge made it. it would have made it interesting.

  • yizhaq

    64 bit has nothing to do with speed! Its just add the ability to use more than 4gb of ram.

    • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

      The current 32-bit ARM processors can access more than 4GB using LPAE. And sorry to tell you but 64-bit instructions have a lot to do with performance.

      • yizhaq

        Well, we all remember the PC going full throttle with first 64bit windows without any difference to the 32 bit version.

        • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

          How well Microsoft did or did not implement 64-bit support in Windows is irrelevant. From a technology point of view 64-bits is faster than 32-bits.

          • Michael T. Babcock

            64 bit software is only faster in cases where there’s code that makes calculations on 64 bit values. In those cases, it takes fewer cycles to calculate a result. Every other time (most of the time), 32 bit is the same speed.

        • Nathan Borup

          The whole reason 64-bit came out is because it was faster. If you think it has nothing to do with speed you need to go back and do some research

        • Brittany Vercillo

          That’s because most software didn’t actually get programmed to be 64 bit compatible -_- it had nothing to do with the OS. As soon as software started to get programmed for 64 the performance was noted.

          That’s the only real con to everything swapping to 64 bit… no one is going to jump to writing 64bit programs

          • hohopig

            In a typical real world situation, the gain is negligible or at most around the region of 10%, unless you are talking about intensive number crunching program like CAD or rendering softwares. Compare to other improvements that can be made (processor speed, memory size .. which is part of the reason for going 64 bit .. but not an inherent property of 64 bit, etc) it is really not that big an improvement.

          • shonangreg

            unless you are talking about intensive number crunching program like CAD or rendering softwares.

            How about 3D gaming and simulation? And virtual machines / emulators?

  • lazarus

    sounds good. though honestly I’m a bit pessimistic.
    I mean, if android still can’t utilize current 32-bit optimally (occasional lag, need better scheduling for multi-core cpu), how will 64-bit will do any better ?

  • Ivan Myring

    I doubt that we will see the in 2014. They arent even pushing them for s.ervers yet

  • Dynamite

    HAAAAA iPhone 5S is 64 bit :P android is behind for a half a year again :D

    • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

      I must say I take my hat off to Apple for making the A7 64-bit, it will be interesting to see if it implements the full ARMv8 instruction set or if it is a hybrid made by Apple.

      But to address your specific point, it isn’t Android that is behind, it is the lack of actual processors that is the issue, Android support for 64-bit won’t be an issue. However again I am very impressed that Apple managed to make the A7 64-bit.

      • smokebomb

        The first time in 6 years their processors are ahead of android.

        • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

          As I said above, not Android but ARM.

          • smokebomb

            As I said above, but to clarify, *In comparing phones*, Apple’s product is ahead for the first time in 6 years.

          • mrjayviper

            their GPU has always top benchmarks and their CPU are at the top3/5 in benchmarks are well.

            That’s a great thing.

        • stucrmnx120fshwf

          Ouch as a hardware man, I shudder at the lack of RAM on iPhones.

    • http://iamzb.com/ Andres Quintana

      to bad it’ll make little real world difference for at least a year

      • mario ongkiko

        Android is neither 32 or 64 bit. Android is based on the dalvik virtual machine system (os). But yes since after ginger breaf, android is running on 64bit environment. Apple merely copied the implementation of android. Now would apple suport more than one gig of ram? Nope. Thats your answer that apple alleged 64 bit, like their retina, is pure gimmick. Retina my ass only 640 PIXELS when the lowest android packs 720 PIXEL, and android packs more than one gb ram, and apple could only handle a gb of ram. Sucks.

    • Sebastian Lundström

      Actually Apple is still behind just google Huawei K3V2 the first 64bit arm processor in a phone (Ascend D-Quad)

      • Aenean144

        So, I put “Huawei K3V2″ into the search engine, and I get this:

        “HiSilicon Technologies today announced its high performance mobile application processor (AP) K3V2 for smartphones and tablets. K3V2 is a quad-core processor with 4 ARM Cortex-A9 cores, a 16-core super GPU and 64-bit memory system. According to the benchmark test results, K3V2 is the fastest application processor both in CPU and GPU. Huawei’s newly announced flagship, Ascend D quad, is the first smartphone based on HiSilicon K3V2 AP.”

        Cortex-A9 CPUs are 32 bit.

  • seyss

    Apple just announced a 64-bit iPhone 5S…………..

    • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

      I must say I take my hat off to Apple for making the A7 64-bit, it will be interesting to see if it implements the full ARMv8 instruction set or if it is a hybrid made by Apple.

      • Nathan Borup

        well it will be interesting to see what happens to the apple app store… because it will take quite a bit of re-engineering for a lot of apps. iOS7 might be pretty useless in it’s beginning stages

        • lesportif

          The whole OS and built in apps are all 64 bit native, and we know apple’s ability to drive developers efforts.

          • Nathan Borup

            yes, but the old OS isn’t, and neither are any of their mobile devices. That means a lot of re-engineering

          • lesportif

            Well obviously the re-engineering is done and nobody cares about old iOSes, so what’s your point ?

          • Nathan Borup

            except they’re releasing 2 models of iphones, one is 64 bit and the other is not, therefore it will be a lot of work. Multiples of every app, and OS

          • lesportif

            Apple has conducted such a work (seamlessly) several times in the past with MacOS. Don’t forget they’re not exactly new to the game ;-)

          • Nathan Borup

            it is totally different when working with desktop cpus. Phones will be a lot of work. Google may be new to the work, but they’re definitely better at it. Apple has actually been taking from google’s software a lot, for instance, multi-tasking, and the notification bar.

          • lesportif

            Hilarious answer Nathan. We’re talking deep OS architecture, instructions, libraries and drivers, not mere UI elements.
            I guess it’s the way it has to be on an Android site. Sad bias.

          • Nathan Borup

            Ok, google is new to 64bit, but you have to realize there is a difference in 64 bit desktop processors and 64 bit ARM processors, which is what apple is working with. It is going to be a difficult thing for apple to pull off, especially with the re-engineering of 3rd party apps from their app store. Its risky business, but i will admit it is in the right direction. And about google being ahead of the game, they have always been ahead in hardware since they started.

          • lesportif

            In what way is Google even in the hardware game ??
            Seriously Nathan, all mobile OSes will be 64bits soon, Apple is the first to make the switch, they master their CPU designs (you certainly know where ARM comes from), they master their OS design, they’ve been an integrated hardware/software designer for almost 40 years and they control the tightest app ecosystem yet.
            How can you even doubt all this ? I’m not saying that the 64bits transition is an easy move but if one company can handle it, Apple surely is.
            They don’t deserve extra credit for that, it’s just the achievement of a long and complex history.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            I don’t think it’ll be a doddle, but Linux and Chrome are 64 bit. Google has probably already done it and it only requires refinement. They’ve known this was coming for ages, like 4k UD, which is in the chips, as well as Android 4.3. It may be in 4.4 and 5 includes the latest Dalvic kernel. Samsung’s next chips will be 64 bit, so obviously their 14 nm chips will be 64 bit next year, why wouldn’t they be near?

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            If only they’d put a decent amount of RAM in, it’d multitask real well.

          • lesportif

            Rumors say the A7 now comes with 2GB RAM.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Hope so, my Nexus 7 and 4, Android 4.3 tablet and smartphone both have 2GB of RAM. Both of them cost as much as 1 cheap iPhone 5c. At the moment I only have 0.9 GB spare on the smartphone, but a power down reboot and RAM boost ought to get that back to 1.4 GB.

          • lesportif

            Those 2 OSes have very different behaviors relative to memory. If you compare the new Nexus 7 and the iPad mini (2GB vs 512MB, I have both) the only use case where the limited memory is showing on the iPad is heavy web browsing with many tabs opened. Besides this, the iPad mini is at least as fast as the Nexus. I guess the OS is much lighter. After a reboot, the iPad shows only 150MB memory usage, but in real use, it’s ALWAYS full, and it’s the same with the iPad 4 (1GB).

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            After a power down reboot, and RAM boost, I was able to get my spare RAM up to 1.54 GB, whilst Apple’s cradle to the grave approach, has a great many advantages. Particularly in 64 bit, as you say when multi tasking, or web browsing, without sufficient RAM, your still going to get the ‘You have too many windows open’ problem. But you’d be right to say, keeping it compact is very important, Google’s decision to focus on speed and reliability, was an act of sheer genius in Jelly Bean, as opposed to Microsoft’s Win 8 approach, of sticking with bloatware. Still it does need to be even more compact, something more along the lines of Chrome OS, people pay a significant premium for simplicity and reliability in iOS, that’s not an irrational consumer decision.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Groan, they didn’t publish my last comment, here we go again, yes there are a great many advantages to iOS’s cradle to the grave approach, particularly in 64 bit, consumers are not daft, to pay a premium for simplicity, speed and reliability. I managed to get 1.54 GB RAM spare, which is very useful for multitasking, Google’s focus on speed and reliability in Jelly Bean (project butter,) was sheer genius compared to Microsoft’s approach, of lets stick with bloatware. However, it needs to be even more compact, I suggest something like Chrome OS.

  • WootWootAPPLE

    from APPLE: hello androidicans! We would like to point out to you all that 64 bit is here today! so HA HA HA we’ll see you guys next year

    • Amadeus Klein

      I’ll wait for Android to get it right, Apple iOS7 is not going to be as bug free as you’d like, Maybe with iOS8 they will get 64 bit right but by then Android will hold the market share for 64 bit devices… Plus Every App that apple doesn’t own still needs completely rewritten for the new architecture, so good luck with that…

      • joser116

        Nope, they can just recompile it. Apple has made it very easy for them, apparently. Therefore, your statement about “Every App that apple doesn’t own still needs completely rewritten for the new architecture” is incorrect. They don’t NEED to be completely rewritten, although I admit that recompiling it is not the best option. Another reason for why the apps won’t NEED to be completely rewritten is because 32-bit apps will still work with the new processor, although I admit that running 32-bit apps in a 64-bit processor will not be of any benefit to the end user.

        • Amadeus Klein

          That’s the point I was trying to make, for a real benefit they need to be re-written, recompiling will not provide much benefit, and those that aren’t won’t see any benefit from it… But admittedly the same issue will apply to android apps when they make the switch as well The difference will be that developers will be more prepared if they choose to be…

          • joser116

            Well, my point was that your statement was technically incorrect, so how is that the point that you are trying to make?… LOL I know what you mean. I’m just messing with you ;)

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Every app that’s 32 bit doesn’t have to be rewritten to 64 bit, that’s the whole point of emulation, when done right.

          • joser116

            I know that. And you are wrong about emulation; 32-bit apps will run natively on the 64-bit capable processor.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Well they probably have good 32 bit emulation, written into the SOC microarchitecture. They will also write good software to facilitate 32 bit apps. But remember when Intel made Itanium, it didn’t emulate 32 bit software well enough and AMD ate their lunch with 64 bit extended. Still I bet they learned that lesson and 32 bit runs well, there’s been a decade of 32 bit emulation on x86/64 after all.

  • xgman

    Well Apple started the 64 bit bandwagon today. . . .

  • Ishaan Malhotra

    wake up!! its already here on iphone 5s!! :p

    • http://iamzb.com/ Andres Quintana

      yea but unless that thing is packing 4gigs or ram the advantage is non existent the only advantage it has atm is the ability to process graphics a little better

  • http://iamzb.com/ Andres Quintana

    64bit will not improve normal phone use it mainly allows the OS to use more ram so unless the 5s is packing 4gigs or ram this is a gimmick like their retina display. 64bit mobile OS isn’t going to do much until we start packing more ram into these devices

    • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

      Technically that isn’t true. Think about multimedia… If you can process multimedia decoding or encoding using 64-bit words rather than 32-bit words then you automatically have a doubling of performance. Also the availability of 64-bit registers reduces reliance on the stack which keeps the calculations within the CPU and so again increases performance. Some of that will depend on how well the compilers are optimized but in principle 64-bits can significantly improve performance.

      • hohopig

        erm .. it does NOT get a doubling of performance … not even theoretically.

        And in real world situation the observed improvements are in the realm of 10 – 20% except for really really memory intensive number crunching programs like simulators or CAD and other graphical programs. There are just too many variables in play and the gain is not really that significant compared to other hardware improvement you can make to a system.

        It should move to 64 bit, but it is not the be all and end all of things.

    • ty

      Please don’t compare Android to IOS in terms of speed cause Android need rewritten not only 64 bit or 4 gig of ram the whole OS need a fix.

      BTW I’m an Android BOWER user for your info.

      • Matthew Wypyszinski

        its only faster in the same sense that a roller coaster is faster than a car. Indeed you will obtain higher speeds than i will, while you sit there and go in a circle, doing nothing with your phone.

      • joser116

        So true. Hopefully Android 5 gives us that rewrite, and we’ll still get to use the old Android apps. And hopefully it includes a solution for all the updates. Google could store all hardware drivers, that our phones need, on its servers and let us do a complete wipe of the system to install the latest Android version while letting us keep our files. Kind of like how Microsoft handles updates, but Google’s will be more refined of course.

    • Roberto Tomás

      it allows individual processes to address more than 4GB of RAM.

  • brendan soliwoda

    64 bit sounds amazing, 4 GB RAM sounds ridiculous. I’m still getting used to the idea of 3 GB of RAM, which I think is plenty for android right now. Also, when it comes to Apple’s new 64 bit processor, I wanna see it up against the snapdragon 800 to see if Apple really does have the edge here.

    • stucrmnx120fshwf

      Of 2GB RAM, I’ve only got 0.9 spare at the moment. We need graphics RAM and the likes of Snapdragon 800′s UD abilities, in 14 nm 64 bit.

  • Roberto Tomás

    64-bit GPUs are not likely, since that is one of the reasons why desktop gpu’s use so much more energy. I’m not sure what good 64-bit does when it is strictly cpu-space computation, but whatever. :) Sounds like its bigger, so it must be better.
    The RAM thing I get very readily. 4GB of ram has a lot of use as 4k video recording, and HEVC/H.265 playback comes into vogue.

    • stucrmnx120fshwf

      Wait a minute, desktop GPUs are often 192 bit, so with Tegra 4 designed to run desktop level games, wouldn’t newer mobile SOCs be 64 bit already. Tegra 4 has 72 Nvidia GPUs, 6 times as many as as Tegra 3′s 12 GPUs, equivalent to 144 AMD GPUs. But yeah, the focus for the future ought to be, 4k UD, like T4 and Snapdragon 800.

      • Roberto Tomás

        the main bus is some large number of bits sure. But internally the cores are still 64 bit. The major work that Nvidia had to do to get their Kepler scaled down for Tegra 5/Logan was to roll back all the 64-bit stuff and revert all the logic to 2xsingle-precision (32 bit) instead (single precision can exactly emulate double precision with only a small penalty if done right).

        • stucrmnx120fshwf

          Sounds about right, but it suggests that if the CPU is 64 bit and the OS is 64 bit, it wouldn’t be exactly moving mountains for the GPU to revert to 64 bit. Especially with 14 nm coming next year, frequency reduced, you’d think they’d run 64 bit, cool as a cucumber. Thanks for the info, here’s hoping for lots of graphics RAM and LPDDR3 soon.

          • Roberto Tomás

            you’re welcome. thanks for chatting about it, I’m not too clear on graphics stuff myself, its good to see that what made sense to me makes sense to others too. — LPDDR3 is here now :) That’s the high speed ram in all these new A15 and krait 300/400 cores. DDR4 will come next — in the PC space they are looking like they might just skip it and go for some high density solution, but for mobile devices DDR4 is perfect because it is full desktop ram that operates at the same power draw as lpddr3.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Yes I know LPDDR3 is here now, both my N7 FHD and N4 have it, good to hear DDR4 has power efficiencies, the combo of lots of graphics RAM, DDR4, 14nm, 64 bit, will help greatly, with what will be a tsunami of Ultra Definition devices. Wherever we can cut the bottle necks in processing, the better, after all we’ll be looking at 250 Nvidia GPU cores, or 500 AMD GPU cores, sometime next year for UD gaming on mobile devices, repeat Teg 4, Snap 800 already UD capable. 39″ UD TVs $700 this Christmas, Toshiba demoed 10″ UD T4 tab 8 months ago, 8 MP cameras can record UD video, fiber to the home, hybrid fiber coax, fiber to the node, 1GB/s WiFi ac, home power line networks to hot spots. If you’ve seen the Edge phone’s 128 GB flash memory, remember a UD movie only takes up 16 GB, with WiFi ac, with error checking, it’d only take 30 seconds to load. Green Rays can hold 64 UD 4k movies, 16 UD 8k movies, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, 4 billion 6″ 3D UD phablets in 2018, people get your $5 reading glasses ready

  • tyty

    apple did it b4 …….

  • liberace

    yet still with the same piss poor battery technology , they should be chucking billions into energy source r&d because there is only so far you can push processing speed without making the battery life a joke.

  • Jeff Jameson

    why in the hell you would need 4gb of ram in a mobile device with a 5 inch screen is beyond me. even 3 gb is probably too much already.

    • Spruce Cycle

      Every 10.1 tablet owner would disagree with you

  • Abood Kadi

    The iPhone 5S is Already here ;)

  • Spruce Cycle

    A 10.1in Samsung Note 64bit with write anywhere Spen tech, multiwindow, multitasking will mark the end of the PC age.

    Folks this is where we are going like it or not. Ur next “computer” will be flat with a convienient dock at home, school or work.

    • slowkums

      Make it 12 or 13″ and I’ll bite. 10 is a little too cozy for me to be productive on.

    • The Power

      Not for me. I can’t see doing 3d design or running my CNC off of a tablet.

    • stucrmnx120fshwf

      I like a 6″, but yup, people are abandoning the bloatware Titanic’s, in droves.

  • icyrock1

    iOS 7 is 64-bit, so I’d hope Android doesn’t fall behind. ;)

  • Joe

    Apple iPhone has it now.

  • Graham Miranda

    Apple made their 64 bit phone already! Android your screwed!

  • Yowan Rdotexe

    Any Cortex-A15 chip can support 40-bit addressing with LPAE(i.e up to 1TB) so this 64-bit crap is pure BS.

    • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

      Yowan, there is more to 64-bit processors than just addressing. For example the availability of 64-bit registers reduces reliance on the stack which keeps the calculations within the CPU and so increases performance.

      • Yowan Rdotexe

        And this brings zero noticeable performance increase for the end user, it’s not like you’re going to run multithreaded operations or do some intense multimedia conversion on an Android device. The whole thing is just another Apple PR stunt as usual. There is simply no need for 64-bit processors in mobile devices right now. RISC registers especially ARM’s aren’t gonna make things any different. Right now focus should be put into increasing the IPC of ARM chips imho.

        • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

          Well historically 16 bit processors where faster (due to architecture not clock speed) than 8 bit, 32 than 16, and now 64 bit than 32 bit. Addressing is only one small aspect, in fact one of the early server 64 bit processors from DEC (the Alpha) didn’t have many extra address lines and could only address a few bits more than a 32 bit processor. It is about the addressing, it is about fundamentally changing the size of the data that is moved around internally in the CPU.

          And yes you are going to run multi-threaded operations, almost everything you do on Android and iOS is multi-threaded or uses multi-processes.

          And yes you are doing multimedia conversion, even watching a video needs fast (often hardware assisted) video decoding.

          You have to remember that not everything is about smartphones, what about tablets, what about hybrid Android devices with built-in keyboards. What about media centers and set top boxes?

          • Yowan Rdotexe

            Tablets and Hybrids? What’s so special about them, they aren’t an argument to push forward the 64-bit idea. Android Apps run in a VM so they cannot directly take advantage of the underlying hardware. Using 64-bit wouldn’t even change that unless Android is reworked. At the Dalvik level the number of bits becomes irrelevant as Apps are native bytecode so they won’t directly benefit from those additional registers at all. Why waste time and resources reworking the entire Android run-time libraries to try to adapt them to AArch64 when enabling LPAE at the kernel level is much easier? We don’t really need those power hungry Cortex-A57 chips considering that battery technology hasn’t even evolved, not to mention that it’s still the ultimate bottleneck factor in mobile tech. That would create a discrepancy when the alternative solution is already there. So are you really willing to sacrifice battery life for the 64-bit hype?

          • http://www.garysims.co.uk garysims

            Tablets and hybrids are very important as they will likely replace many laptops over the next few years. Just look at the HP Slate 21 or the Asus Transformer Pad range. Bringing 64-bit desktop level performance to these devices is important.

            As for the Dalvik, yes it will need to be optimized for 64-bit to get the best performance, but once it is then the bytecode will be executed quicker. I think Linaro have added 64-bit support for Dalvik already.

            Again you seem to be fixated on addressing, having LPAE support would give access to large amounts of physical memory and that code is already in the Linux kernel but that isn’t the reason to go to 64-bit. It isn’t about addressing.

            As I mentioned in other comments on this post, moving to 64-bit doesn’t necessarily mean the processor will be a battery killer. First the 64-bit CPUs are being built with a new process (20nm), second ARM is working on the Cortex-A53 which is a low-energy version of the 64-bit processor, similar to the Cortex-A7, and third it is normally the screen and wireless technology which use up all the battery not the CPU.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Granted, see my comments above.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            No, but frequency reduced from 15 GHz to 5GHz, 14nm chips in 64 bit, will be very useful for tabs and phablets using UD. That is, they will use less power, per calculation.

          • stucrmnx120fshwf

            Agreed, however emulation is extremely important, remember how unsuccessful Itanium was. Whereas AMD’s 64 bit extended began to eat Intel’s lunch, until they caved and used 64 bit ex. Ultra Definition will drive much of this, Toshiba demonstrated a 10″ UD tab 8 months ago. It’s really just 4 FHD 5″ phablet screens in a square after all. 64 bit will help when there’s 2GB of graphics RAM and 6GB of LPDDR3. Next year we start moving to 14nm, at Samsung and Intel. Surprised we haven’t seen more of AMD in the mobile space given there graphics market share, perhaps some kind of ARM 64 bit licensing. Along with Samsung chip manufacture, Samsung have said that they would be happy to build for other companies, because 14 nm is a huge economy of scale operation for any company. I think Microsoft did a lousy job on 64 bit bloatware and hope we’ll see some nice, tight coded Chrome phablets some day.

  • mechabee

    I’d love a 64bit phone… I won’t love constantly having a dead battery.

  • Chaspo2139

    Yes, that’s the start of the future for mobility in smartphones.

  • boughtat 16

    So maybe in a year or so Android will catch up to iOS? Poor Samsung, their spies didn’t catch this. What’s Googles incentive to go to 64bit? Their ad tracking won’t be any more effective, maybe Android won’t be 64bit until 2015….

  • hohopig

    The comparison chart is a bit flawed. Not to say that the data is flawed but what it is used to justify. The main point you are making is that 64 bit is much faster than 32 bit .. fine so far. But then you use the comparison chart for A57 and A15 .. and the difference between these chips is MUCH MUCH more than simply difference between 32 and 64 bit.

    So in the end, we can only know that the speed gain from the change to 64 bit is AT MOST what is shown in the chart, but most likely a mere fraction of it since there are many other differences between the two chips.

  • JamesWimberley

    ¨ … the real benefits will come when ARM releases its Cortex-A57 and Cortex-A53 processors.¨ What do you mean? SFIK ARM has released both designs, and designs are what it sells. Actual products depend on the chip foundries like TSMC and the SOC builders like Samsung.TSMC and ARM announced a tapeout of the A57 in April.

  • DaveN

    Me too said the Android crowd at Android Authority. But if you listen to the fandroids bashing Apple on Apple forums, they are saying that 64 bit is useless and is slower!

  • hohopig

    “When ARM releases their A53 and A57 processor”? — haven’t they already been announced and unveiled in late 2012?

  • blover

    Well i wonder when Adobe will release fully featured photoshop and pro premiere for android, Inaddition I would like to see a Final cut 4k series in iPhone 6/6s.
    other wise i don’t see any point to have 4gb ram in mobile

  • Guest

    What about the 4GB file limit?